Courses

Oxbridge students sit for lecture during Oxbridge in Boston

Courses

Students attending Oxbridge in Boston choose one subject per the two-week session(s) into which they enroll. They attend classes six mornings and three afternoons a week. Our courses are taught by faculty from universities such as MIT, Boston University, andTufts University and aim to give students a taste of the Cambridge quality education enjoyed by the likes of Barack Obama, Mark Zuckerberg, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, and John F. Kennedy.

Government And Politics

How are governments created, and what happens when they collapse? How does the spread of democracy impact economic growth, security, and welfare? Are there alternatives to democracy besides tyranny? In their attempts to answer such questions, students consider everything from different political models to the role of individuals via spin-doctoring, party politics, and the influence of mass media.

International Law

How does the law shape relationships between nations? And how does it govern relations between non-state actors? Students address Public and Private International Law, and consider how International Law affects business, Human Rights, the prosecution of international crimes, sovereignty, trade, and war. The course culminates in a moot war crimes trial.

Neuropsychology

Students are introduced to the principles of neuropsychology and the role that specific brain regions play in producing behavior. They cover a wide range of topics - from the history of neuropsychology, assessment, and neuroanatomy, to clinical disorders - using cases as illustration. Students acquire knowledge of the measurement of human behavior and how the brain is responsible for sensory, motor, and cognitive functions, such as attention, language, memory, and emotion.

Anticipated Full Course List

This intense plunge into the complex business of applying to college addresses everything bright and ambitious students need to know and do as they contemplate this critical juncture in their lives. It teaches them how to plan the whole process, how to negotiate the different types of application, how to go about crafting a college essay, and how to prepare for interview. More than that, the course is designed to help students decide where they would like to study and what they want to get out of the experience, a process that involves rigorous self-assessment and reflection. Students also learn what to look for during college visits, what questions to ask while discovering the latest trends in college applications and graduate futures. Students leave the course with a clear sense of what they need to do next. (Second Session Only)

Students discover the economic institutions that affect all our lives, learn how they have changed over time, and the consequences of these changes. They develop a comprehensive grasp of contemporary economic and social institutions ("capitalism", "globalization" "the market") and their potential futures, not least by exploring their historical development.  Finally, they move on to address foundational concepts, principles, and assumptions of the dominant neoclassical economic theory (micro and macro).

How are governments created, and what happens when they collapse? How does the spread of democracy impact economic growth, security, and welfare? Are there alternatives to democracy besides tyranny? In their attempts to answer such questions, students consider everything from different political models to the role of individuals via spin-doctoring, party politics, and the influence of mass media. 

How does the law shape relationships between nations? And how does it govern relations between non-state actors? Students address Public and Private International Law, and consider how International Law affects business, Human Rights, the prosecution of international crimes, sovereignty, trade, and war. The course culminates in a moot war crimes trial.

A general introduction for students interested in a career as health-care professionals, this hands-on course includes an introduction to human anatomy, physiology, medical-history taking, aspects of physical examination, including learning to take Vital Signs, and an introduction to neurosciences, brain function, and laboratory interpretation, all illustrated by reviews of clinical cases. Alongside, students present their own research regarding key controversies in medicine today. 

From Uber to iTunes, smart phones and apps are engines of our modern existences. Students learn to design and implement basic phone apps. In doing so, they are introduced to key aspects of Swift and Java. To gain an even deeper understanding of the context in which they are working, they are also introduced to basic principles of operating systems, as well as some of the theoretical foundations of computing. All told they leave the course with a deep understanding of smart phones and app development. Lab fee of $150 US per session.

Students are introduced to the principles of neuropsychology and the role that specific brain regions play in producing behavior. They cover a wide range of topics, from the history of neuropsychology, assessment, and neuroanatomy, to clinical disorders, using cases as illustration. Students acquire knowledge of the measurement of human behavior and how the brain is responsible for sensory, motor, and cognitive functions, such as attention, language, memory, and emotion.