Courses

Students during Medicine and the Brain course observing human skulls

Courses

Students at The Cambridge Tradition can choose from 18 academic and creative courses that are designed to make use of Cambridge and its extraordinary resources. All the courses are experiential. They involve daily field-trips to museums, eminent guest speakers, project-work, and more. Our most popular courses include Medicine and the Brain, Aerospace Engineering, and Global Business. Descriptions for courses are below, and you can follow the link to read more about all our courses.

Aerospace Engineering

Aerospace Engineering is, quite literally, "rocket science" — the creation of aircraft and spacecraft. Our high school students taking this summer course at Cambridge examine a variety of disciplines within the industry, including aerodynamics, electronics, mechanics, operations systems, statistics, and thermodynamics. Students go through every stage in the creation of a new vehicle, including aerodynamic profiling, engine sizing, and structural design.

Astronomy and Astrophysics

Cambridge is the ideal observatory from which to explore fundamental questions about the universe. How did it begin, and what is our place within it? What is time, and will it ever come to an end? This course takes students on a journey through space, from the infinitesimally small components of atoms to the unimaginably large. This summer course at Cambridge addresses topics including the Big Bang, galaxy formation, the history of our own solar system, orbital mechanics, and string theory.

Medicine and the Brain

Oxbridge high school students examine the development of medicine during their summer course at Cambridge with a focus on neuroscience. They learn the main principles of cognitive psychology, neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, and clinical methods and practices. Students also study the technology behind such diagnostic tools as CT and MRI scanners.

Anticipated Full Course List

Aerospace Engineering is about the creation of aircraft and spacecraft – quite literally “rocket science!” Participants examine the disciplines most important to the industry, including aerodynamics, electronics, mechanics, operations systems, statistics, and thermodynamics. The course culminates with the replication of real design offices of either aircraft or spacecraft companies. Students go through every stage in the creation of a new vehicle, including aerodynamic profiling, engine sizing, and structural design. 

Cambridge’s beauty provides students with the perfect environment in which to find inspiration, appreciate architectural history and aesthetics, and improve their design and model-making skills. They develop a portfolio of sketches before turning ideas and designs into three-dimensional models to display in the program’s Arts Exhibition. Materials Fees of $75 US per session. 

Cambridge is the ideal observatory from which to explore fundamental questions about the universe. How did it begin, and what is our place within it? What is time, and will it ever come to an end? This course takes students on a journey through space, from the infinitesimally small components of atoms to the unimaginably large. It addresses topics including the Big Bang, galaxy formation, the history of our own solar system, orbital mechanics, and string theory. 

This intense plunge into the complex business of applying to college addresses everything bright and ambitious students need to know and do as they contemplate this critical juncture in their lives. It teaches them how to plan the whole process, how to negotiate the different types of application, how to go about crafting a college essay, and how to prepare for interview. More than that, the course is designed to help students decide where they would like to study and what they want to get out of the experience, a process that involves rigorous self-assessment and reflection. Students also learn what to look for during college visits, what questions to ask while discovering the latest trends in college applications and graduate futures. Students leave the course with a clear sense of what they need to do next.

Students compose fiction and poetry under the guidance of a published writer, with Cambridge’s rich literary history as their inspiration. They explore their own potential by experimenting with new forms and styles of writing. Successful poets and writers give workshops in which students learn about the creative process and the practicalities of publication. Students develop a portfolio of their best writing and collaborate to design, edit, and publish a literary magazine.

Through workshops, debates, and visits to police stations and criminal courts, students explore individual and social theories of crime, philosophies of punishment, criminal profiling, incident analysis, and basic forensic science. They consider the causes of crime, the influence of the media upon crime, and issues of race and gender within the context of the British and American criminal justice systems. 

Students learn the principles of engineering science. Both world-renowned and local examples are examined, and the findings are applied to a variety of case studies to solve mechanical, structural, and architectural problems. They complete the course by designing a model engineering project of their own. 

At the University from which the Cambridge Five were recruited, and in which the world’s most famous fictional spy, James Bond, studied, this course, which blends politics and history with practice, examines the methods and techniques of the great intelligence services – Mossad, the KGB, the CIA, MI5, and MI6. Students address the future of intelligence operations, the challenges of field work, and the ethics of espionage in terms of international cooperation, competition, and conflict.

Students learn about the instruments and institutions that make up the modern economy and are vital to budding entrepreneurs, such as bonds, capital markets, derivatives, and stock markets. They also familiarize themselves with the principles of corporate accounting and reporting that assist businesses in their decision-making processes. Major course projects include real-life case studies, a stock exchange investment competition, and the design of a start-up. 

In the university that cracked the DNA code, students discover the exciting disciplines that are transforming medicine. Working on projects with researchers, they discover medical genetics, genetic linkage, DNA manipulation, sequencing, genomics, and study inherited diseases. They go on to analyze the factors underlying diseases and explore the significance of, and the ethical issues surrounding, genetic engineering, cloning, and gene therapy. 

Students explore the tools and structures of international commerce, focusing on free enterprise, economic development, and engagement with the global marketplace. Visiting the University's renowned Judge Business School, students obtain firsthand experience of a cutting-edge business education. Course projects include real-life case studies and the design of a start-up venture. 

This course addresses International Relations through its theoretical bases and by focusing on key current issues. Subjects covered include globalization and its political, economic, and social effects; environmental challenges; new forms of war and peace; the changing nature of security challenges; mass-migration; the complexities of areas like the Middle East and South-East Asia; and the relationships and rivalries that define global order today. 

Students discover how the British and American legal systems reflect the values and institutions of their respective societies. They consider precedent-setting cases and delve into various branches of legal practice. Through meetings with lawyers, legal scholars, and human rights advocates, and through visits to working courtrooms, they discover how lawyers turn theory into practice. The Major course culminates in a formal moot court competition. 

This hands-on course introduces students to key aspects of medical science and modern medical practice. Combining specialist lectures with experiments and class discussions, students learn the principles of human anatomy and physiology, the pathology and significance of certain diseases, the main challenges that medical science faces today, and are introduced to the wide and growing range of possible careers in medicine.

Students examine the development of medicine with a focus on neuroscience. They learn the main principles of cognitive psychology, neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, and clinical methods and practices, and study the technology behind such diagnostic tools as CT and MRI scanners. 

As COVID-19 has reminded us, pandemics have regularly altered the course of history. Students are introduced to some of the great epidemics, such as the bubonic plague, cholera, HIV, the measles, and polio. They discover how different ages responded to them, and how the diseases, and the responses, often combined to provoke long-term political, economic, and societal change. They discuss what, if anything, can be learned from past attempts to tame disease. Moving on, they analyze the different global responses to COVID-19. They learn how statisticians assess the disease and how health officials make their decisions. The course culminates in the class becoming its own Ministry of Health and responding to the appearance of a new virus.

Students receive guidance in artistic, landscape, and portraiture photography. This helps them record their exploration of England and its culture, and to produce a comprehensive photographic record of their experiences. The class culminates in a formal exhibition. Students need their own DSLR camera with USB cable, charger, and at least one 8 GB memory card.  Materials fees of $100 US per session.

Students investigate a wide range of psychological topics, including dreams, memory, consciousness, anxiety, body language, gender, and sexuality. Alongside, they uncover the history of the subject, study case histories, learn about various mental disorders, and different research methodologies. They go on to design their own experiments under the guidance of research specialists and practicing clinicians.