Guest Speakers

Oxford Tradition guest speakersOxford Tradition guest speakers
Every year our programs invite a special selection of guest speakers – successful men and women drawn from very different walks of life – to engage with students on a wide variety of political, economic, social, artistic, academic, and literary topics. 


Listed below are some of the speakers from recent summers.

Adam Allen

Mr. Allen worked for Oxbridge Academic Programs for ten years before moving on to his true love — police work. He joined the New York Police Department Transit Bureau in 2008 and has since worked on “Operation Impact” with the Anti-Terrorism unit. In his talk “NYPD: Stories from the Streets” he shares his unique perspective on the city. A dedicated officer, Mr. Allen engages our students with discussions on highly charged topics such as terrorism, national security, and international law enforcement.


    John Armour

    Professor Armour is the Lovells Professor of Law and Finance at Oriel College, Oxford University, having held previous posts at Cambridge University, Pennsylvania Law School, the University of Bologna, and Columbia Law School. He is widely published in the fields of company law, corporate finance, and corporate insolvency and has contributed to projects commissioned by the Department of Trade and Industry, the Financial Services Authority, and the Insolvency Service. A former teacher for Oxbridge Academic Programs, Prof. Armour talks to students about the financial crisis, and the legal issues surrounding big business and global markets in the 21st century.


      Joanna Bagniewska

      Joanna recently finished her doctoral research at Oxford University’s Wildlife Conservation Research Unit, focusing on the diving behaviour of semi-aquatic animals. She received her MSc from Oxford, and her BSc from Jacobs University Bremen and Rice University; Joanna previously worked on a number of species, ranging from wombats and wallabies to mole-rats and mink. Her academic interests include biotelemetry, behavioural ecology and conservation biology.


        Tim Carroll

        Director of Productions for New Kent Opera, Mr. Carroll is the former Associate Director of Shakespeare's Globe in London, was Associate Director of the Northcott Theatre in Exeter, and began his career at the English Shakespeare Company. He has directed many operas, including Tosca for the English Touring Opera in 2006 and Monteverdi's Orfeo, Handel's Acis, and Galatea and Britten's Albert Herring for the New Kent Opera, as well as countless Shakespeare productions. At the Globe, he directed Twelfth Night, Richard II, Romeo and Juliet, and The Tempest, among others, as well as several productions in Oxford where he was a teacher on The Oxford Tradition for many years. Tim is one of the most gifted and innovative directors working in London today and is able to give our students unique insights into all aspects of directing a Shakespeare production.


          Richard Carwardine

          The President of Corpus Christi College, Richard Carwardine is one of Britain's leading historians, focusing on America in the nineteenth century. His books include "Transatlantic Revivalism: Popular Evangelicalism in Britain and America 1790-1865" and "Evangelicals and Politics in Antebellum America." His "Lincoln: A Life of Purpose and Power" won the Lincoln Prize in 2004. He has lectured widely on both sides of the Atlantic and acted as adviser to the Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission. He is working on a study of religion in American national construction between the Revolution and the Civil War. He was elected President of Corpus in 2010.


            Nick Hutchison

            Mr. Hutchison is a director, actor, and lecturer, who has worked for the BBC, ITV, the Royal Shakespeare Company, the Royal National Theatre, and Shakespeare's Globe. He has served as a judge for the English-Speaking Union's Shakespeare on the Platform competition, directs for RADA's Shakespeare summer course, was for six years an assessor for the National Theater's Connections Program, and sits on RADA audition panels as well as the accreditation panel for the National Council for Drama Training. He has directed many Shakespeare plays throughout the UK and the US and, as an established actor, has played parts in About A Boy with Hugh Grant, Restoration with Robert Downey Jr, Miss Potter with Renee Zellwegger, and Golden Years with Ricky Gervais.


              Andrew Motion

              Professor Motion is the former Poet Laureate for all of the UK, a post renowned for its other previous holders such as William Wordsworth, Lord Tennyson, and Ted Hughes. He is a Professor of Creative Writing at Royal Holloway, University of London, and the author of acclaimed biographies and anthologies of poetry, including Philip Larkin: A Writer's Life (1994) and Keats (1998). In 2006 he published his autobiography, In the Blood: A Memoir of My Childhood, and in 2007 he wrote The Five Acts of Harry Patch, dedicated to the last surviving soldier to have fought in the trenches of the First World War.


                Dr. David Mulford

                Dr. Mulford is the United States Ambassador to India, having in the past held a number of private and public sector positions. He was Chairman International and Member of the Executive Board for Credit Suisse First Boston in London, England, and a senior investment advisor to the Saudi Arabian Monetary Agency, whose responsibilities included managing the investment of Saudi oil revenues. In the US government, he has served as Assistant Secretary for International Affairs and as Undersecretary for International Affairs for the Department of the Treasury. He has been awarded the Légion d'Honneur by the President of France and The Alexander Hamilton Award by the Secretary of the United States Treasury.


                  General Sir Michael Rose

                  General Sir Michael Rose, KCB CBE DSO QGM, is one of the most highly decorated British soldiers of modern times. He was Adjutant General of the British Army, Aide-de-Camp General to Queen Elizabeth II, and Commander of the United Nations Protection Force that operated in Bosnia. He was originally commissioned into the Coldstream Guards, was selected for service in the Special Air Service (SAS) and then commanded the 22nd SAS Regiment. He has served in Malaysia, Oman, Germany, Northern Ireland, and the Falkland Islands.


                    Andrew Rosenheim

                    Andrew came to the United Kingdom as a Rhodes Scholar in 1977. Since that time, he has served as the MP of Penguin Press, published numerous books, and been named editor for Amazon UK Kindle Singles, a branch of Amazon that allows authors to publish their long essays or short stories. His latest book, Little Tokyo Informant, was published in August 2013.


                      Prof Christopher Sangwin

                      Christopher Sangwin is Professor of Technology Enhanced Science Education at the University of Edinburgh. A leading figure in mathematics education in the UK, he held Senior Lectureships at Birmingham and Loughborough Universities. For over a decade he worked with the UK Higher Education Academy to promote the learning and teaching of university mathematics. He is the author of a number of books, including How Round is Your Circle?, which illustrates and investigates the links between mathematics and engineering using physical models.


                        Keith Sharman

                        Keith Sharman is a producer for the CBS NEWS programs 60 Minutes and 60 Minutes Sports. He began his television career in 2000 as an intern at the Charlie Rose show on PBS where he helped cover the disputed 2000 presidential election. In 2001 Mr. Sharman was hired by CBS NEWS as a broadcast associate. In 2003 he was promoted to Associate Producer at 60 Minutes to work for one of the show’s founding correspondents, Mike Wallace. Mr. Sharman would go on to work with correspondents Steve Kroft and Anderson Cooper on stories about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Russian politics, the U.S. financial crisis, the Bernie Madoff scandal, as well as features about the Large Hadron Collider, the disappearing honeybee crisis, and footballer David Beckham. In May 2011, Mr. Sharman co-produced correspondent Scott Pelley’s ground-breaking two-part investigation into cyclist Lance Armstrong’s illegal drug use. A month later, when Pelley took over the CBS Evening News as anchor and managing editor, Mr. Sharman became a producer for that show and covered both the Newtown, CT tragedy and Boston Marathon bombings. In September 2013 Mr. Sharman returned to 60 Minutes as a producer. He has been nominated for eight Emmy awards and twice received the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Award, the broadcast equivalent of the Pulitzer Prize. The first was for a 60 Minutes story called “The Mother of All Heists,” a report on corruption in the Iraqi Ministry of Defense. The second was for the entire CBS NEWS team’s coverage of Newtown. Mr. Sharman was born in Essex, England and moved to Fort Lauderdale, Florida in 1982. He attended The Oxford Tradition in 1992 and studied War in World History and Theater. In 1998 he graduated from The University of Texas at Austin with special honors in History and a minor in English. He currently resides in Brooklyn, NY.


                          Will Wintercross

                          Mr. Wintercross has worked as a photojournalist for The Daily Telegraph since 2007. His interest in journalism began long before he flew to Zimbabwe at age 18 to document the civil unrest occurring in the region. He has worked for the Associated Press, The Football Association, Getty Images, Agence France Presse, and The Independent. He recently returned from his fifth trip to Syria where he has been documenting the civil war for The Daily Telegraph. Other assignments have taken him to Mali, South Africa, Botswana, Kosovo, Cambodia, Laos, Kenya, Egypt, as well as throughout the UK and U.S. Mr. Wintercross talks about his experience as a photojournalist: whether it’s shooting the world’s highest cricket match on Everest or photographing war-torn areas where he has been targeted by a sniper, arranged border crossings with a “fixer”, or getting interrogated for hours in a holding cell.