Courses

Our students choose any two courses on the following pages, one as a MAJOR course and one as a MINOR (WORKSHOP in New York, Boston, and at UCLA). Major courses meet six mornings a week and, depending on the course, include in-class time for fieldwork, labs, workshops, guest speakers, group discussions, and one-on-one instruction. They also include homework and require project and preparation time outside of class. Minor courses meet three afternoons a week, with no homework and all work contained within the class session. A Minor course offers a sample of a different subject than the Major and most students find their Minor a welcome opportunity to try a new subject for the first time.


COURSE GUARANTEE DATES

 

There is no final application deadline. We accept applications on a rolling basis until a program is full, but we do have Course Guarantee Dates. Students who apply to a program by the Course Guarantee Date and are accepted to the program have their first choice of courses guaranteed, subject to enrollment minima. As we begin receiving applications in September, we recommend that students apply as soon as possible for courses that may fill early.

 

The Oxford Spring Seminar.................................................................... January 5, 2018

The Oxford Tradition.............................................................................. January 12, 2018

The Cambridge Tradition........................................................................ January 19, 2018 

Programs in the USA, France, Spain, and Scotland............................... January 26, 2018

The Oxford Prep and The Cambridge Prep............................................ February 2, 2018 

The Oxford Summer Seminar and The New York College Seminar..... April 13, 2018


Humanities

  • Using America’s oldest university and the revolutionary hotbed that was Boston as archives, students get to grips with the primary sources that map out the making of the world’s superpower. They study its triumphs – democracy, freedom, mass immigration, assimilation, westward expansion, and startling economic growth.  At the same time they come to terms with its failures – the treatment of Native Americans, the enduring nightmare of slavery, and the violence of civil war. 

  • Students become historical detectives as they reconstitute the daily lives of ancient civilizations through a mixture of lab work, the investigation of artifacts in museums such as the Pitt Rivers, and visits to local digs. They learn how to read evidence and design their own research projects, even exploring how an archeologist of the future might view us.

  • With the Louvre, Orsay, Rodin, and Pompidou collections all within reach, this course introduces students to Classical, Medieval, Renaissance, Romantic, Realist, Impressionist, and Modernist art. Working in museums, students learn how to read masterpieces by Michelangelo, da Vinci, David, Delacroix, Manet, Rodin, and Monet, as well as important works by prominent Surrealist, Cubist, and Pop artists. 

    Through frequent visits to museums and galleries to study canonical works, students receive a broad introduction to major schools of art and art theory, with special emphasis placed upon exploring a variety of critical and analytical approaches. Students learn to read works of art and understand them according to different historical, cultural, and visual criteria. 

    Through frequent visits to museums and galleries to study canonical works, students receive a broad introduction to major schools of art and art theory, with special emphasis placed upon exploring a variety of critical and analytical approaches. Students learn to read works of art and understand them according to different historical, cultural, and visual criteria.

    The city’s museums and galleries become classrooms as students move between the Metropolitan Museum of Art, MoMA, and the Guggenheim, and from paintings and sketches to sculptures and installations, learning how to read works of art and familiarizing themselves with the range of tools historians have developed to assess, analyze, and critique art.


    World class collections such as the Picasso Museum, the MACBA, the Fundacio Joan Miro, the Fundacio Antoni Tapies, Gaudi’s rocambolesque creations, and the many smaller galleries that make Barcelona so vibrant, are the classrooms and resources for this course. Students learn to read and analyze images, and come to grips with the fundamentals of curation. 

  • This course explores some of the key moments in British history from Roman times to Brexit. Alongside carefully planned visits, students use primary, literary, archeological, and artistic evidence to analyze the contexts of epoch-defining events in British history.

    A tour through the most dramatic and pivotal moments of British History, exploring off the beaten track to examine the forgotten, the strange, and the controversial. From Pictish warlords to Reformation heretics, through questing knights, witches, spies, scientists, sportsmen, and soldiers, to the ordinary men and women engaged in shaping "Britain" and the British past. The course will examine how Britain was constructed, politically, economically, and culturally, and will explore the tensions this created to provide an understanding of Britain and its historical presence in the 21st century.

  • This course examines the literature, philosophy, history, art, and scientific thought of Ancient Greece and Rome. From readings of classical authors to tours of the Ashmolean and local Roman sites, students receive an imaginative introduction to Greco-Roman civilization, and explore why the classical world has been admired for millennia, and how it continues to influence society today.

  • Taking inspiration from the city’s quirky history, students seek to master different genres. They experiment with comedy, drama, horror, realism, satire, and tragedy, as well as memoir and poetry. They also tackle technical principles like characterization, dialogue, and narrative structure. One day is dedicated to the machinations of publication. Topics include copy-editing and manuscript preparation in different media. Students leave Oxford with a budding corpus of work.

    Taking inspiration from the city’s quirky history, students seek to master different genres. They experiment with comedy, drama, horror, realism, satire, and tragedy, as well as memoir and poetry. They also tackle technical principles like characterization, dialogue, and narrative structure. One day is dedicated to the machinations of publication. Topics include copy-editing and manuscript preparation in different media. Students leave Oxford with a budding corpus of work.

    Taking inspiration from the city’s quirky history, students seek to master different genres. They experiment with comedy, drama, horror, realism, satire, and tragedy, as well as memoir and poetry. They also tackle technical principles like characterization, dialogue, and narrative structure. One day is dedicated to the machinations of publication. Topics include copy-editing and manuscript preparation in different media. Students leave Oxford with a budding corpus of work.

  • How might the rise of the “selfie stick” be related to the popularity of first-person video games? What does our obsession with professional sports say about us? And why exactly is Kim Kardashian famous? This course analyzes the strange phenomena that define contemporary society through radical postmodern philosophy. Students will be challenged to engage with writers from Jean Baudrillard to Slavoj Zizek as a means of critically reassessing the world around them.

    How might the rise of the “selfie stick” be related to the popularity of first-person video games? What does our obsession with professional sports say about us? And why exactly is Kim Kardashian famous? This course analyzes the strange phenomena that define contemporary society through radical postmodern philosophy. Students will be challenged to engage with writers from Jean Baudrillard to Slavoj Zizek as a means of critically reassessing the world around them.

    To what extent do people unconsciously take on ideas from the society in which they were raised? Are we all unwitting products of forces we did not choose? This course combines philosophy with critical theory to examine why the world is the way it is. Students call on a range of thinkers to analyze the political and societal trends that define the 21st century. They learn to interrogate information, discuss controversial topics sensitively, and construct persuasive arguments.

  • Students learn the history of Empires, from the Akkadian to the Mongol to the Third Reich. But they also interrogate the concept of Empire itself. What, if anything, do Empires have in common? Do all Empires share fundamental characteristics? How are they established and why do they collapse? Calling on examples from the contemporary to the ancient worlds, students cross disciplinary boundaries and blend subjects as diverse as anthropology, drama, and the social sciences.

  • Students are introduced to some of the greatest writers and poets in the canon. Every day they discover and learn how to analyze a scene, chapter, speech, soliloquy, or poem drawn from a classic before situating it in the author’s broader oeuvre and literary history.

    Students are introduced to some of the greatest writers and poets in the canon. Every day they discover and learn how to analyze a scene, chapter, speech, soliloquy, or poem drawn from a classic before situating it in the author’s broader oeuvre and literary history.

    Students are introduced to some of the greatest writers and poets in the canon. Every day they discover and learn how to analyze a scene, chapter, speech, soliloquy, or poem drawn from a classic before situating it in the author’s broader oeuvre and literary history.

    Students are introduced to some of the greatest writers and poets in the canon. Every day they discover and learn how to analyze a scene, chapter, speech, soliloquy, or poem drawn from a classic before situating it in the author’s broader oeuvre and literary history.

    This course examines some of the great works of English literature from Chaucerto Zadie Smith amidst the evocative surroundings of Oxford. Students engage with a wealth of writers in the literary pantheon to improve their skills in close reading, textual criticism and clear, informed writing. Each student engages in a close study of a chosen text in the final week.

    This course examines some of the great works of English literature amidst the evocative surroundings of Cambridge. Students engage with a wealth of writers in the literary pantheon to improve their skills in close reading and clear, persuasive writing. Each student engages in a study of a text and presents a special project in the final week. 

    Students are introduced to some of the greatest writers and poets in the canon. Every day they discover and learn how to analyze a scene, chapter, speech, soliloquy, or poem drawn from a classic before situating it in the author’s broader oeuvre and literary history.

  • Students enhance their own expatriate experience by dialoguing with the great writers, artists, and musicians who once traveled great distances to call Paris home.  Focusing on the twentieth century, this course traces the Parisian terrain of expats such as Hemingway, Fitzgerald, Picasso, Julia Child, and David Sedaris, exploring how and why Paris proved such a fertile breeding ground for their diverse forms of creativity.  The most important “textbook” is Paris itself, which is studied via visits to the museums, cafés, markets, and bookstores that inspired these illustrious emigrés.

  • Students use France’s rich and varied cinematographic heritage as a window into the nation’s cultural soul. They are introduced to France and the French as they are laughed at, and cried over, by the world’s oldest cinematographic industry, from the Frères Lumière to Mathieu Kassovitz, via the Poetic Realism of the 1920s, Vichy’s dark cinema, and the Nouvelle Vague.  Students compare and contrast France’s versions of itself with those produced by Hollywood.  

  • This fusion of international relations, law, political science, and war studies challenges students to understand the order and disorder of the modern world. Technological connectivity and the spread of democracy has streamlined and strengthened global culture. But the rise of rogue states and the clash of civilizations in the Middle East has presented more challenges to the unity of nations than ever before. The Major course builds toward a Model UN. 

  • This course explores events and issues that have been concealed, little understood, or rarely studied. Students are introduced to local secrets, popular conspiracies, the machinations of conniving politicians and governments, and recent historical controversies and disputes.

    This course explores events and issues that have been concealed, little understood, or rarely studied. Students are introduced to local secrets, popular conspiracies, the machinations of conniving politicians and governments, and recent historical controversies and disputes.

  • Roman language, culture, belief, and artistic taste are examined through the ancient world’s greatest texts, notably Ovid’s Metamorphoses and Martial’s Epigrams. A central feature of the course is providing students with the opportunity to improve their facility for translation. Prerequisites for the Major: minimum two years of Latin and a letter of recommendation from your Latin teacher.

  • This course examines the masterpieces of four Oxford authors: J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings, C.S. Lewis’s The Chronicles of Narnia, Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland, and Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials. Students examine their worlds, symbolic systems, and mythologies, as well as their influence on Harry Potter, through workshops, field trips, debates, and group readings. Prior knowledge of the stories is encouraged.

    This course examines the masterpieces of four Oxford authors: J.R.R. Tolkien’s The Lord of the Rings, C.S. Lewis’s The Chronicles of Narnia, Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland, and Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials. Students examine their worlds, symbolic systems, and mythologies, as well as their influence on Harry Potter, through workshops, field trips, debates, and group readings. Prior knowledge of the stories is encouraged.

  • Students explore a host of topics drawn from major philosophical, literary, and religious texts. They consider fundamental questions through ancients like Plato and Aristotle; Oxford philosophers like Hobbes and Locke; idealists like Kant; iconoclasts like Nietzsche; and contemporary philosophers.

    Students explore a host of topics drawn from major philosophical, literary, and religious texts. They consider fundamental questions through ancients like Plato and Aristotle; Oxford philosophers like Hobbes and Locke; idealists like Kant; iconoclasts like Nietzsche; and contemporary philosophers.

  • How should individuals balance competing ethical obligations? How does a society differentiate rights from liberties and duties from obligations? Drawing on texts from the greatest Scottish philosophers, Hume, Smith, Ferguson, and Duns Scotus, as well as from a wide range of thinkers, students discover Ethics and how they have gone on to catalyze social movements such as the expansion of the franchise, abolitionism, women’s rights, universal human rights, criminal rehabilitation, and animal liberation.

  • This course explores human experience through poetry, prose, and drama. Readings, discussions, and workshops examine psychological themes in the Western canon, including narcissism, madness, tragedy, sexual dysfunction, and humor. Freud and Jung provide a psychoanalytical foundation for engaging with a variety of literary works.

  • Students consider the origins of slavery before addressing its manifestations throughout the ages. They learn about the slavery that made Athenian liberty and Roman power possible; Arab slavery; the Ottoman child-tribute system; the Atlantic trade; and modern-day slavery. At the same time they learn about the groups that fought slavery, looking at abolitionism on different continents but also at the ongoing struggle, led by NGOs and international organizations, against slavery and trafficking. Finally they study the socio-cultural consequences of slavery, contrasting the experiences of different parts of the world. 

  • Students debate what makes a terrorist and what makes one person’s freedom fighter another person’s criminal. They chart the successes and failures of terrorism throughout the ages - its justifications, its methods, and its networks. Case studies range from late-19th century anarchists, the assassination of Franz Ferdinand, the Stern Gang, Al Qaeda, ISIS, and the 21st-century concept of the non-state actor. Students seek to grasp how contemporary governments are dealing with the legal and moral challenges posed by terrorists.

  • War has been one of the greatest forces for change in human history and continues to shape the world. Violence in the Middle East and Africa, guerilla conflicts in South America and the Far East, and the global ‘War on Terror’ are the most recent examples of mankind’s long history of conflict and combat. While covering military history, this course also examines war from other aspects: the political, economic, social, ethical, and psychological. It examines how and why wars are fought, what has changed, and what has remained the same, from conflicts in Ancient Greece to the war in Syria.

    War has been one of the greatest forces for change in human history and continues to shape the world. Violence in the Middle East and Africa, guerilla conflicts in South America and the Far East, and the global ‘War on Terror’ are the most recent examples of mankind’s long history of conflict and combat. While covering military history, this course also examines war from other aspects: the political, economic, social, ethical, and psychological. It examines how and why wars are fought, what has changed, and what has remained the same, from conflicts in Ancient Greece to the war in Syria.

  • By working from primary sources such as the Malleus Maleficarum, sifting through the records of famous trials - including animal trials - and by investigating anthropology, ethnography, and the history of religions, students discover why, at different times, different societies have accused men, women, children, and animals, of witchcraft and heresy. Did witches and witchcraft ever really exist, or was the whole phenomenon simply an expression of the fevered imaginations of the victims as well as accusers?

  • 1789 revolutionized the language of politics just as industrialization was beginning to revolutionize the way mankind lived.  Working from primary sources, students discover how different parts of the world reacted to these twin challenges, focusing on revolutions, on the devastating conflicts that, so often, pitted new against old and, in the twentieth century, descended into madness and mass murder. At the same time they discover how society adapted to change, with the emergence of universal education, parliamentarianism, and massconsumerism. As a final project, students debate the future in the wake of new nationalisms, rivalries, and protectionisms. 

  • Students become experts in the conflict that made the modern world. They investigate its causes; the aims of the different participants; their tactics; and the battles and campaigns that marked the War, from Dunkirk to Okinawa. At the same time they assess how effectively nations transformed their economies to fight total war, how cleverly the different belligerents used intelligence, and the importance - in victory as well as defeat - of the home front, before moving on to analyze the extraordinary consequences of history's most devastating conflict.    

Sciences & Social Sciences

  • This course provides students interested in a career in business or investment with the core accounting skills that are vital to success. Working from real-life case studies, including complex fraud cases, they learn how to assess and judge economic performance and how to read complex financial statements.  In the process they learn the fundamentals of auditing and bookkeeping.  

  • Addressing the omnipresence of advertising and marketing, students assess the power of suggestion, persuasion, and product placement. Using a range of case studies and creative examples, they explore early salesmanship, modern advertising, branding, and the use of new media. Balancing creative skills with business acumen, they engage in branding exercises, interactive sales games, and the design and development of their own advertising campaign. 

    Addressing the omnipresence of advertising and marketing, students assess the power of suggestion, persuasion, and product placement. Using a range of case studies and creative examples, they explore early salesmanship, modern advertising, branding, and the use of new media. Balancing creative skills with business acumen, they engage in branding exercises, interactive sales games, and the design and development of their own advertising campaign. 

  • Aerospace Engineering is about the creation of aircraft and spacecraft – quite literally “rocket science!” Participants examine the disciplines most important to the industry, including aerodynamics, electronics, mechanics, operations systems, statistics, and thermodynamics. The course culminates with the replication of real design offices of either aircraft or spacecraft companies. Students go through every stage in the creation of a new vehicle, including aerodynamic profiling, engine sizing, and structural design. 

  • The exploration of the structure of the human body has been at the center of medical study for hundreds of years. It remains essential for both physicians and surgeons to understand diseases and treatments. This course exposes students to the same essential basis of knowledge, enabling them to situate disease, and health, in the wider context of the working body.

  • How do people make the most financial assets, whether as private individuals or as managers of huge pension funds? Students are introduced to asset management - its evolution, rules, and strategies. They test different approaches by overseeing their own investment portfolios during the month. These include how to invest in bonds, commodities, equities, and property, as well as radical approaches such as art. The controversial role hedge funds have played in transforming returns on assets is also studied. 

  • Cambridge is the ideal observatory from which to explore fundamental questions about the universe. How did it begin, and what is our place within it? What is time, and will it ever come to an end? This course takes students on a journey through space, from the infinitesimally small components of atoms to the unimaginably large. It addresses topics including the Big Bang, galaxy formation, the history of our own solar system, orbital mechanics, and string theory. 

  • Taught by experts, students discover how the economy really works. They cover the evolution of commerce and banking from its ancient origins to the present, including the development of investment banking and venture capital, the financialization of the economy, high speed and algorithmic trading. They learn how money itself is evolving with the emergence of non-fiat cryptographic currencies like Bitcoin. Through visits to financial institutions ranging from local bank branches to the Bank of England and the trading floors in London’s Square Mile, they investigate how money moves and markets operate, as well as what makes a career in finance.

  • Mixing economics with psychology and game theory, this course seeks to understand what drives individual economic decisions. What psychological and emotional factors induce people to buy a $5 cup of coffee? How can we explain consumers’ decisions when they depart from the expectations of standard economic models? How do risk and uncertainty impact people’s spending? Students investigate areas such as luxury goods, healthcare, insurance, and labor. 

  • Big Data is one of the most sought after university courses, but how do we really harness its potential to grow businesses and build smarter cities? This pre-college course shows how Big Data upends every discipline: from algorithmic trading in financial markets to predicting what kinds of paintings will go on display in the Met, to how social media creates filter bubbles in news consumption. Students are equipped with the data scientist's toolkit: from statistical techniques for predictive analysis to mapping, and acquiring data through APIs and web scraping. 

  • HIV, malaria, and tuberculosis alone are thought to result in ten percent of all deaths every year. The ongoing search for new pathogens is being conducted against the backdrop of outbreaks of diseases such as Ebola, SARS, and Zika. This interdisciplinary medical course investigates the biology of disease. Topics include animal models of human disease; cancer; conventional therapy treatment strategies; the genetics of complex and simple traits; the interaction between environment and genetics; Karyotypic analysis; the molecular and cellular basis of genetic diseases; and the role of oncogenes in tumor initiation and treatment.

  • Students discover how biotechnology combines principles of biology, chemistry, physics, and engineering to create the products, processes, and technologies of the future. Through experiments and seminars they engage with new pharmaceuticals, genetic diagnoses and therapies, sustainable biofuels, and genetically modified foods. Students also explore the social, ethical, and economic implications of biotechnology.

  • Students examine the dynamic world of business by working through specific case studies. They seek to uncover some of the keys to successful business leadership, and to discover what makes one entrepreneur succeed while another fails. By trying their hand at game theory and various negotiation tactics, they get to grips with managerial organization in all its forms.

  • Students examine the dynamic world of business by working through specific case studies. They seek to uncover some of the keys to successful business leadership, and to discover what makes one entrepreneur succeed while another fails. By trying their hand at game theory and various negotiation tactics, they get to grips with managerial organization in all its forms.

    What is the French touch? Why are French companies leaders in so many sectors? With LVMH, Atos, AXA, and BNP Paribas as case studies, students learn the fundamentals of business operations. Accounting, management, human resources, organization, strategy, and development are some of the topics addressed. Students also investigate the new start-up ventures coming out of Paris, visit the Bourse stock exchange and business schools.

    Students examine the dynamic world of business by working through specific case studies. They seek to uncover some of the keys to successful business leadership, and to discover what makes one entrepreneur succeed while another fails. By trying their hand at game theory and various negotiation tactics, they get to grips with managerial organization in all its forms.

    Students examine the dynamic world of business by working through specific case studies. They seek to uncover some of the keys to successful business leadership, and to discover what makes one entrepreneur succeed while another fails. By trying their hand at game theory and various negotiation tactics, they get to grips with managerial organization in all its forms.

    Students examine the dynamic world of business by working through specific case studies. They seek to uncover some of the keys to successful business leadership, and to discover what makes one entrepreneur succeed while another fails. By trying their hand at game theory and various negotiation tactics, they get to grips with managerial organization in all its forms.

  • Students are introduced to the world of corporate finance and its primary institutions through dynamic workshops and exercises. They cover 21st-century financial realities for budding entrepreneurs and multinational corporations. Major course projects include real-life case studies, a stock exchange investment game, and the design of a theoretical start-up venture.

    Students discover the instruments and institutions that make up modern finance and are vital to budding entrepreneurs. From principles of finance, such as compound interest, time value of money, and portfolio theory, they move on to how finance and financial markets actually work. They address the main business principles of strategic planning, marketing, economics, finance and accounting. Concepts covered include SWOT analysis, developing a marketing strategy, as well as working through how to create a product centered company, and draft a business plan. For their final project, they create a mock company that they present in a “Shark Tank”, mirroring the high pressure, quick tempo presentations used at colleges, business schools, and startup incubators around the world.

  • How do business organizations start, grow, and thrive? What analytical, interpersonal, and technical skills are required to make sense of and address the problems facing companies of all sizes? This course includes visits to local businesses and Oxford’s Saïd Business School and covers a diverse range of topics that includes economics, finance management, information technology, marketing, law, and purchasing. It culminates in the design and creation of a business model.

  • Cancer affects nearly 100 million new victims a year, provoking up to 9 million deaths. Students assess the environmental and genetic factors that are believed to cause cancers, the chemical and molecular mechanisms through which the disease grows, its symptoms, how diagnostics are made, how sufferers are treated, how the treatments are continually evolving, and how close different teams around the world are to finding permanent cures. Alongside they learn about public health campaigns that could save millions of lives every year.

  • In this hands-on course, through a mixture of experimentation and problem-solving, students are initiated to chemistry and introduced to fundamental concepts such as stoichiometry, chemical reactions, thermochemistry, gas laws, atomic structure, the periodic table, and chemical bonding. 

  • Students learn the fundamentals of the true language of the 21st century – coding.  Following an introduction to programming and its core concepts, they learn to code via hands-on projects in robotics, video games, and web and app design. Students are exposed to a variety of programming languages, including Python, Ruby on Rails, and C++, and choose one language to focus on for a final project. Students visit university computer science laboratories and local tech start-ups. Lab fee of $150 US for the Major; $75 US for the Minor. 

  • Students get to grips with a key element of success in business: information management. They discover the strategies that businesses, NGOs, and governments, use to advance, spin, and control communications, and how these succeed (and occasionally fail). Drawing on real-life cases, and looking at all types of media, they find out what it takes to deliver messages effectively before creating and running their own media campaigns for an issue or product of their choice.

  • Students use Barcelona’s remarkable success story as a case study to learn all about the world of Communications: brand development, marketing strategy, public relations, social media, mass media, and advertising. Barcelona is known for its creativity and graphic design. In meetings with local industry experts, students learn what it takes to deliver messages effectively, and to lead a successful campaign. 

  • Students learn how to solve problems and design algorithms, and work on translating these algorithms into functional computer programs. Exploring this rapidly-evolving craft exposes them to the various careers in computing and how machines will shape the future. They work in teams to identify a need, develop a concept, work out user requirements, and create a design which they transfer to the screen. Lab fee of $150 US for the Major, $75 US for the Minor. 

  • Students leverage everyday instruments, such as smartphones, to gain insight into the theoretical foundations and concepts involved in modern computer systems, design and development frameworks, problem-solving, coding, Android and Apple application design, and web frameworks.  They are exposed to languages such as Java, iOS App Design, Swift, and Objective-C as they identify a space in the market and design an app to fill it. Lab fee of $150 US for Major; $75 US for Workshop.

    Students leverage everyday instruments, such as smartphones, to gain insight into the theoretical foundations and concepts involved in modern computer systems, design and development frameworks, problem-solving, coding, Android and Apple application design, and web frameworks.  They are exposed to, among others, Java, iOS App Design, Swift, and Objective-C as they identify a space in the market and design an app to fill it. Lab fee of $150 US for Major; $75 US for Minor.

    Students explore the theoretical foundations and concepts involved in modern computer systems and information technology before moving on to study Application Design. Working in teams, they identify a need, develop a concept, work out user requirements, and create a design which they transfer to the screen. Lab fee of $150 US for the Major; $75 US for the Minor.

  • How did the universe come into being, and how will it end? What is the universe made of? What is space, and what is time? Cosmology takes as its subject nothing less than the entirety of the universe – its evolution, origin, and structure. Students examine the development of galaxies, the shining of stars, and the Big Bang theory. They also venture into the unresolved mysteries of space, including black holes and dark matter. Cambridge has hosted an unbroken chain of cosmologists from Isaac Newton to Stephen Hawking. Where better to gain a foundation in this fascinating subject? 

  • Taking inspiration from the city’s quirky history, students seek to master different genres. They experiment with comedy, drama, horror, realism, satire, and tragedy, as well as memoir and poetry. They also tackle technical principles like characterization, dialogue, and narrative structure. One day is dedicated to the machinations of publication. Topics include copy-editing and manuscript preparation in different media. Students leave Oxford with a budding corpus of work.

    Taking inspiration from the city’s quirky history, students seek to master different genres. They experiment with comedy, drama, horror, realism, satire, and tragedy, as well as memoir and poetry. They also tackle technical principles like characterization, dialogue, and narrative structure. One day is dedicated to the machinations of publication. Topics include copy-editing and manuscript preparation in different media. Students leave Oxford with a budding corpus of work.

  • Working in the city that famously developed its own variety of strong policing in order to defeat a rampant crime problem, and drawing on aspects of criminology, law, psychology, and forensics, students seek to understand what turns people into criminals and what society does in response to the challenges of criminal behavior. They spend time with the NYPD officers who fight crime on the streets, discover how society deals with criminals by meeting with lawyers and visiting courthouses, and learn how the authorities are adapting to challenges such as cybercrime and Terrorism.

    Through workshops, debates, and visits to police stations and criminal courts, students explore individual and social theories of crime, philosophies of punishment, criminal profiling, incident analysis, and basic forensic science. They consider the causes of crime, the influence of the media upon crime, and issues of race and gender within the context of the British and American criminal justice systems. 

    Through workshops, debates, and visits to police stations and criminal courts, students explore individual and social theories of crime, philosophies of punishment, criminal profiling, incident analysis, and basic forensic science. They consider the causes of crime, the influence of the media upon crime, and issues of race and gender within the context of the British and American criminal justice systems. 

  • How might the rise of the “selfie stick” be related to the popularity of first-person video games? What does our obsession with professional sports say about us? And why exactly is Kim Kardashian famous? This course analyzes the strange phenomena that define contemporary society through radical postmodern philosophy. Students will be challenged to engage with writers from Jean Baudrillard to Slavoj Zizek as a means of critically reassessing the world around them.

  • How might the rise of the “selfie stick” be related to the popularity of first-person video games? What does our obsession with professional sports say about us? And why exactly is Kim Kardashian famous? This course analyzes the strange phenomena that define contemporary society through radical postmodern philosophy. Students will be challenged to engage with writers from Jean Baudrillard to Slavoj Zizek as a means of critically reassessing the world around them.

  • How might the rise of the “selfie stick” be related to the popularity of first-person video games? What does our obsession with professional sports say about us? And why exactly is Kim Kardashian famous? This course analyzes the strange phenomena that define contemporary society through radical postmodern philosophy. Students will be challenged to engage with writers from Jean Baudrillard to Slavoj Zizek as a means of critically reassessing the world around them.

  • Students discover how - from toxicology and fingerprints to DNA samples - forensic science has progressed over the past 150 years to meet ever-changing legal standards. They learn how modern crime scenes are secured and searched, how material is treated in laboratories, and how different types of evidence are used to sort legal fact from criminal fiction. Branching out, they discover how forensic science has achieved breakthroughs in a multitude of disciplines, such as archeology, history, and geology.

    Students discover how - from toxicology and fingerprints to DNA samples - forensic science has progressed over the past 150 years to meet ever-changing legal standards. They learn how modern crime scenes are secured and searched, how material is treated in laboratories, and how different types of evidence are used to sort legal fact from criminal fiction. Branching out, they discover how forensic science has achieved breakthroughs in a multitude of disciplines, such as archeology, history, and geology.

  • This course applies economic concepts to social issues facing the developing world. How can corporations and businesses help to promote growth and societal change? How might global markets be restructured to improve the lives of entire populations? Using econometric and statistical tools, students gain a firm understanding of how economics, geography, and sociology can be harnessed to improve the fate of the world while helping them devise development projects of their own.

  • Students investigate life from the Cambrian Explosion to the Cretaceous–Paleogene extinction event. They learn about dinosaur classification, behavior, and ecology. Using the Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences and the Natural History Museum, where they go behind the scenes to get up close with specimens and paleontologists, they learn about discovery and excavation.

  • From Adam Smith to Ernst Schumacher, Oxford is renowned for its contributions to economics. Students are introduced to the theories that govern economic thought. They also discover the fundamentals and methodologies of economic modeling. They go on to test their knowledge against contemporary economic problems in order to understand how the world economy works and how it might evolve.

    From Adam Smith to Ernst Schumacher, Oxford is renowned for its contributions to economics. Students are introduced to the theories that govern economic thought. They also discover the fundamentals and methodologies of economic modeling. They go on to test their knowledge against contemporary economic problems in order to understand how the world economy works and how it might evolve.

    From Adam Smith to Ernst Schumacher, Oxford is renowned for its contributions to economics. Students are introduced to the theories that govern economic thought. They also discover the fundamentals and methodologies of economic modeling. They go on to test their knowledge against contemporary economic problems in order to understand how the world economy works and how it might evolve.

    From Adam Smith to Ernst Schumacher, Oxford is renowned for its contributions to economics. Students are introduced to the theories that govern economic thought. They also discover the fundamentals and methodologies of economic modeling. They go on to test their knowledge against contemporary economic problems in order to understand how the world economy works and how it might evolve.

    Brexit, the future of the Euro - in this course students discover the economic institutions that affect all our lives, learn how they have changed over time, and the consequences of these changes. They develop a comprehensive grasp of contemporary economic and social institutions ("capitalism", "globalization", "the market") and their potential futures, not least by exploring their historical development. They address the foundational concepts, principles, and assumptions of the dominant neoclassical economic theory (micro and macro), and go on to test their knowledge against current issues.

    Students discover the economic institutions that affect all our lives, learn how they have changed over time, and the consequences of these changes. They develop a comprehensive grasp of contemporary economic and social institutions ("capitalism", "globalization" "the market") and their potential futures, not least by exploring their historical development.  Finally, they move on to address foundational concepts, principles, and assumptions of the dominant neoclassical economic theory (micro and macro).

    From Adam Smith to Ernst Schumacher, Oxford is renowned for its contributions to economics. Students are introduced to the theories that govern economic thought. They also discover the fundamentals and methodologies of economic modeling. They go on to test their knowledge against contemporary economic problems in order to understand how the world economy works and how it might evolve.

    With The Wealth of Nations as their guide, students are introduced to the history of the discipline and the different theories that govern economic thought. They are exposed to the fundamentals and methodologies of economic modeling and go on to test Smith’s theories, those of his critics, and their own knowledge, against the contemporary world economy.

    Cambridge has produced almost as many eminent economists as it has scientists. Students follow in the footsteps of John Maynard Keynes and Amartya Sen, and are introduced to the theories that govern contemporary economic thought. They also discover the fundamentals and methodologies of economic modeling. They go on to test their knowledge against contemporary economic problems in order to understand how the world economy might evolve. 

    Using the city that, over the past two centuries, has contributed more than any other to making the world rich, while also bankrupting it on several occasions, as their classroom, students analyze the behavior of economic agents as they make decisions to allocate scarce resources in multiple markets. They learn how prices and quantities are determined. They also learn about, among other topics, supply and demand analysis, theories of consumer and firm behavior, market efficiency, and competitive markets and monopolies as they seek to understand how the economy might evolve. 

  • Students learn the biology of diseases such as Ebola, AIDS, Tuberculosis, Zika, Multiple Sclerosis and Alzheimer’s disease, Prion protein diseases, diabetes, Hemophilia, and different types of cancers. They acquire the habit of thinking scientifically about the causes of diseases and about research to treat unknown diseases. As the course progresses, students specialize in the biology of one type of disease, addressing its epidemiology, etiology, treatments, and cures.

  • Advised by industry and NGO experts, students address the problems associated with maintaining lifestyles and sustaining growth while eliminating dependency on fossil fuels. They study the history of energy production; analyze the economic benefits of production while assessing its environmental and political consequences; and carry out thorough and precise economic, political, and scientific evaluations of a wide range of alternatives before writing a synthesis of their research.

  • Students learn the principles of engineering science. Both world-renowned and local examples are examined, and the findings are applied to a variety of case studies to solve mechanical, structural, and architectural problems. They complete the course by designing a model engineering project of their own. 

    Students learn the principles of engineering science. Both world-renowned and local examples are examined, and the findings are applied to a variety of case studies to solve mechanical, structural, and architectural problems. They complete the course by designing a model engineering project of their own. 

    Students learn the principles of engineering science. Both world-renowned and local examples are examined, and the findings applied to a variety of case studies to solve mechanical, structural, and architectural problems. They complete the course by designing a model engineering project of their own.

    Students learn the principles of engineering science. Both world-renowned and local examples are examined, and the findings applied to a variety of case studies to solve mechanical, structural, and architectural problems. They complete the course by designing a model engineering project of their own.

  • Students discover what drives entrepreneurs, the rules they follow, and the ones they defy. They learn how to identify demand, determine fixed and marginal costs, generate a business plan, canvas for support, calculate overheads, estimate break-even and future value, and manage debts and depreciation. For their final project students launch their own mini-businesses.

  • Students discover what makes and drives entrepreneurs, what rules they should follow, and which ones to defy. They learn how to identify demand, generate a business plan, canvas for support, calculate overhead, determine fixed and marginal cost, estimate break-even and future value, and manage debts and depreciation. They identify a gap or need in the market and produce their own business and marketing plans before launching pop-up businesses. 

  • At the University from which the Cambridge Five were recruited, and in which the world’s most famous fictional spy, James Bond, studied, this course, which blends politics and history with practice, examines the methods and techniques of the great intelligence services – Mossad, the KGB, the CIA, MI5, and MI6. Students address the future of intelligence operations, the challenges of field work, and the ethics of espionage in terms of international cooperation, competition, and conflict.

    At the University from which the Cambridge Five were recruited, and in which the world’s most famous fictional spy, James Bond, studied, this course, which blends politics and history with practice, examines the methods and techniques of the great intelligence services – Mossad, the KGB, the CIA, MI5, and MI6. Students address the future of intelligence operations, the challenges of field work, and the ethics of espionage in terms of international cooperation, competition, and conflict.

  • Students learn about the instruments and institutions that make up the modern economy and are vital to budding entrepreneurs, such as bonds, capital markets, derivatives, and stock markets. They also familiarize themselves with the principles of corporate accounting and reporting that assist businesses in their decision-making processes. Major course projects include real-life case studies, a stock exchange investment competition, and the design of a start-up. 

  • Exploiting the resources of the world’s financial capital – Wall Street, the NYSE – students discover the instruments and institutions that make up modern finance and are vital to budding entrepreneurs.  From principles of finance, such as compound interest, time value of money, and portfolio theory, they move on to how finance and financial markets actually work. They address the main business principles of strategic planning, marketing, economics, finance, and accounting. Concepts covered include SWOT analysis, developing a marketing strategy, as well as working through how to create a product centered company and draft a business plan. For their final project, they create a mock company that they present in a “Shark Tank”, mirroring the high pressure, quick tempo presentations used at colleges, business schools, and startup incubators around the world.

  • By analyzing recent conflicts, students get to grips with the variable nature of the 21st century battlefield, from urban counterinsurgency and asymmetric conflicts to cyber war. New and emerging warfighting technologies and their impacts are studied, including manned and autonomous drones, cyber worms like Stuxnet, self-guided bullets, and radicallyimproved stealth cloaking of planes and ships. The ethical and strategic implications of these changes are considered, as are opportunities for diplomacy and peace. 

  • Participants learn the core principles of genetics, and come to understand the main methods used in genetic research. Topics include the function and structure of the DNA molecule; Mendelian principles of inheritance; chromosome behavior, number, and structure in human cells; the identification and classification of genetic mutation; as well as the latest advances in genetic research, such as the Human Genome Project and genetic engineering. Students depart with a clear picture of what genes are, how they are inherited, and how they may be altered.

    Through a mixture of project work and presentations, students develop an understanding of genetics from the chemical to the genomic level, evolutionary theory, the medical, social, and ethical aspects of genetics, and the types of technologies and experimental techniques used to examine and manipulate genes and genomes. As they discover the extraordinary potential of a discipline that is changing lives, they learn how intelligently to read and critique scientific papers and popular scientific writing. 

    In the university that cracked the DNA code, students discover the exciting disciplines that are transforming medicine. Working on projects with researchers, they discover medical genetics, genetic linkage, DNA manipulation, sequencing, genomics, and study inherited diseases. They go on to analyze the factors underlying diseases and explore the significance of, and the ethical issues surrounding, genetic engineering, cloning, and gene therapy. 

    Students address the exciting findings that have emerged from recent genetic research and are transforming all our lives. Working on research projects, they study medical genetics, genetic linkage, DNA manipulation, sequencing, genomics, and inherited diseases. At the same time they address the medical and ethical consequences of our ever-greater understanding of the cellular keys to life.

    Participants learn the core principles of genetics, and come to understand the main methods used in genetic research. Topics include the function and structure of the DNA molecule; Mendelian principles of inheritance; chromosome behavior, number, and structure in human cells; the identification and classification of genetic mutation; as well as the latest advances in genetic research, such as the Human Genome Project and genetic engineering. Students depart with a clear picture of what genes are, how they are inherited, and how they may be altered.

    Participants learn the core principles of genetics, and come to understand the main methods used in genetic research. Topics include the function and structure of the DNA molecule; Mendelian principles of inheritance; chromosome behavior, number, and structure in human cells; the identification and classification of genetic mutation; as well as the latest advances in genetic research, such as the Human Genome Project and genetic engineering. Students depart with a clear picture of what genes are, how they are inherited, and how they may be altered.

    Participants learn the core principles of genetics, and come to understand the main methods used in genetic research. Topics include the function and structure of the DNA molecule; Mendelian principles of inheritance; chromosome behavior, number, and structure in human cells; the identification and classification of genetic mutation; as well as the latest advances in genetic research, such as the Human Genome Project and genetic engineering. Students depart with a clear picture of what genes are, how they are inherited, and how they may be altered.

    Participants learn the core principles of genetics, and come to understand the main methods used in genetic research. Topics include the function and structure of the DNA molecule; Mendelian principles of inheritance; chromosome behavior, number, and structure in human cells; the identification and classification of genetic mutation; as well as the latest advances in genetic research, such as the Human Genome Project and genetic engineering. Students depart with a clear picture of what genes are, how they are inherited, and how they may be altered.

  • This course explores the transformation of the Earth. How has this created distinct landscapes, places, and territories? Students answer this question by examining the world from geographical perspectives. This hinges on phenomena including climate, evolution, landscape, and tectonics, as well as the processes that created them. Other topics include the growth and distribution of population; the characteristics of land use; colonialism and geopolitics; the geography of economic development and modernization; and issues such as gender, poverty, race, and religion.

  • Students explore the tools and structures of international commerce, focusing on free enterprise, economic development, and engagement with the global marketplace. Visiting the University's renowned Judge Business School, students obtain firsthand experience of a cutting-edge business education. Course projects include real-life case studies and the design of a start-up venture. 

    Students explore the tools and structures of international commerce, focusing on free enterprise, economic development, and engagement with the global marketplace. Visiting the University's renowned Judge Business School, students obtain firsthand experience of a cutting-edge business education. Course projects include real-life case studies and the design of a start-up venture. 

  • Students become experts in today’s global health challenges. They study diseases such as AIDS, malaria, Zika, and ebola, public health issues such as obesity, diabetes, and drug availability, and health crises caused by natural disasters. They examine the roles aid agencies play in dealing with international crises and debate the ethical and logistical issues of modern-day global health. Students learn about the different career possibilities in the field and the skills needed to excel in each specialization.

  • How are governments created, and what happens when they collapse? How does the spread of democracy impact economic growth, security, and welfare? Are there alternatives to democracy besides tyranny? In their attempts to answer such questions, students consider everything from different political models to the role of individuals via spin-doctoring, party politics, and the influence of mass media. 

  • This course explores events and issues that have been concealed, little understood, or rarely studied. Students are introduced to local secrets, popular conspiracies, the machinations of conniving politicians and governments, and recent historical controversies and disputes.

    This course explores events and issues that have been concealed, little understood, or rarely studied. Students are introduced to local secrets, popular conspiracies, the machinations of conniving politicians and governments, and recent historical controversies and disputes.

    This course explores events and issues that have been concealed, little understood, or rarely studied. Students are introduced to local secrets, popular conspiracies, the machinations of conniving politicians and governments, and recent historical controversies and disputes.

  • What are human rights, who determines them, and why? What are the key contemporary human rights issues? How can our thoughts about human rights shape attitudes toward foreign aid, global inequality, intervention, justice, terrorism, and war? How effectively can human rights be defended and enforced? Students address these questions through a mixture of classwork, lectures, and field trips to local NGOs. In so doing they examine the role and importance of human rights in modern society, paying close attention to whether we are ruled by law or by lawyers.

  • Immunology is an increasingly significant area of laboratory medicine that focuses on the immune system and its role in fighting disease. Participants study antigen-antibody reactions, autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases, allergies, the development of the immune system and its deficiencies, hematological malignancy, hypersensitivity, immunoglobulin genetics and structures, and immune responses to infections and tumors.

  • Taking advantage of our residence’s proximity to Barcelona’s financial center, students gain first-hand knowledge of current issues in the world of business and economics by studying local corporations. They perform case studies on topics ranging from brand positioning to crisis management and – to cap off the course – develop and present a business plan for a start-up venture. 

    This course introduces students to the world of international business and its practices. They visit institutions such as Oxford’s Saïd Business School and engage with various financial and business topics. Course projects include real-life case studies, a real-time investment game, and the design of a start-up venture.

  • Students assess the key role that Wall Street has played in the development of the world economy. In doing so, they analyze its economic successes as well as the catastrophes that have punctuated its colorful history. Guided by some of the key figures working in the market today, students evaluate possible futures for New York in a global economy that features unprecedented competition. 

  • Through classes, discussions, and group activities, students are introduced to the principles of international law and the institutions that animate it (the UN, the WTO, the ICC, and NGOs). They explore topics that include regime change and nation-building in a world in which the enforcement of international law is also the exertion of international power. They conclude by staging mock trials involving topical scenarios.

    How does the law shape relationships between nations? And how does it govern relations between non-state actors? Students address Public and Private International Law, and consider how International Law affects business, Human Rights, the prosecution of international crimes, sovereignty, trade, and war. The course culminates in a moot war crimes trial.

  • This course addresses International Relations by focusing on key issues of the day. Subjects covered include globalization and its political, economic, and social effects; environmental challenges; new forms of war and peace; the changing nature of security challenges; peacekeeping operations; the regional complexities of areas like the Middle East, Africa, and South-East Asia; and the relationships and rivalries that define global order today.

    This course addresses International Relations by focusing on key issues of the day. Subjects covered include globalization and its political, economic, and social effects; environmental challenges; new forms of war and peace; the changing nature of security challenges; peacekeeping operations; the regional complexities of areas like the Middle East, Africa, and South-East Asia; and the relationships and rivalries that define global order today.

    This course addresses International Relations by focusing on key issues of the day. Subjects covered include globalization and its political, economic, and social effects; environmental challenges; new forms of war and peace; the changing nature of security challenges; peacekeeping operations; the regional complexities of areas like the Middle East, Africa, and South-East Asia; and the relationships and rivalries that define global order today.

    This course addresses International Relations by focusing on key issues of the day. Subjects covered include globalization and its political, economic, and social effects; environmental challenges; new forms of war and peace; the changing nature of security challenges; peacekeeping operations; the regional complexities of areas like the Middle East, Africa, and South-East Asia; and the relationships and rivalries that define global order today.

    This course addresses International Relations by focusing on key issues of the day. Subjects covered include globalization and its political, economic, and social effects; environmental challenges; new forms of war and peace; the changing nature of security challenges; peacekeeping operations; the regional complexities of areas like the Middle East, Africa, and South-East Asia; and the relationships and rivalries that define global order today.

    In the city that is home to the United Nations, students delve into the theories and mechanisms that govern relations between states and blocs. They supplement their exposure to the international context by examining a variety of current issues. They learn how and why policy decisions are made, how they are enforced, and how their repercussions affect us. At the end of the course, students select a country to represent in a model UN project. 

    This course addresses International Relations by focusing on key issues of the day. Subjects covered include globalization and its political, economic, and social effects; environmental challenges; new forms of war and peace; the changing nature of security challenges; peacekeeping operations; the regional complexities of areas like the Middle East, Africa, and South-East Asia; and the relationships and rivalries that define global order today.

  • This course addresses International Relations by focusing on key issues of the day. Subjects covered include globalization and its political, economic, and social effects; environmental challenges; new forms of war and peace; the changing nature of security challenges; peacekeeping operations; the regional complexities of areas like the Middle East, Africa, and South-East Asia; and the relationships and rivalries that define global order today.

  • This course addresses International Relations through its theoretical bases and by focusing on key current issues. Subjects covered include globalization and its political, economic, and social effects; environmental challenges; new forms of war and peace; the changing nature of security challenges; mass-migration; the complexities of areas like the Middle East and South-East Asia; and the relationships and rivalries that define global order today. 

    Working in the country that, for centuries, lent its language to diplomacy, and in the city that has hosted more famous treaty negotiations than any other, students address International Relations both through its theoretical bases and by focusing on key issues of the day. Subjects covered include globalization and its political, economic, and social effects; environmental challenges; new forms of war and peace; the changing nature of security challenges; peacekeeping operations; the regional complexities of areas like the Middle East, Africa, and South-East Asia; and the relationships and rivalries that define global order today. 

    Combining theory, case studies, and hands-on projects, students address the leading IR issues of our time. They examine how bodies such as the UN, WTO, EU, and ICC act upon the world stage, and how sovereign nations influence (and are influenced by) the world beyond their own borders. Globalization, peacekeeping, security, terrorism, diplomatic negotiation, legal arbitration, the media, and the interface between Islam and the West, are among the topics discussed. Students in this course hone their critical thinking, debate, and presentation skills. 

  • Students discover how the British and American legal systems reflect the values and institutions of their respective societies. They consider precedent-setting cases and delve into various branches of legal practice. Through meetings with lawyers, legal scholars, and human rights advocates, and through visits to working courtrooms, they discover how lawyers turn theory into practice. The Major course culminates in a formal moot court competition. 

    Students examine the British and American legal systems and learn how they reflect the values and institutions of their respective societies. Emphasis is placed on legal history and modes of thought, precedent-setting cases, current controversies, and the kind of first-hand courtroom observation that brings them to life. Each course includes visits to a court and sessions with lawyers. 

    Students examine the British and American legal systems and learn how they reflect the values and institutions of their respective societies. Emphasis is placed on legal history and modes of thought, precedent-setting cases, current controversies, and the kind of first-hand courtroom observation that brings them to life. Each course includes visits to a court and sessions with lawyers. 

    Students examine the British and American legal systems and learn how they reflect the values and institutions of their respective societies. Emphasis is placed on legal history and modes of thought, precedent-setting cases, current controversies, and the kind of first-hand courtroom observation that brings them to life. Each course includes visits to a court and sessions with lawyers.

    Students examine the British and American legal systems and learn how they reflect the values and institutions of their respective societies. Emphasis is placed on legal history and modes of thought, precedent-setting cases, current controversies, and the kind of first-hand courtroom observation that brings them to life. Each course includes visits to a court and sessions with lawyers. 

    Students examine the British and American legal systems and learn how they reflect the values and institutions of their respective societies. Emphasis is placed on legal history and modes of thought, precedent-setting cases, current controversies, and the kind of first-hand courtroom observation that brings them to life. Each course includes visits to a court and sessions with lawyers.

    Students discover how the British and American legal systems reflect the values and institutions of their respective societies. They consider precedent-setting cases and delve into various branches of legal practice. Through meetings with lawyers, legal scholars, and human rights advocates, and through visits to working courtrooms, they discover how lawyers turn theory into practice. The Major course culminates in a formal moot court competition. 

  • Through a series of interactive classes, debates, and seminars, students examine the evolving relationship between the Law and Human Rights, with a particular focus on some of today’s major Rights issues – not least freedom of movement, immigration, genocide, terrorism, global health inequalities, and information technology. Students examine the roles played by the United Nations and its agencies, the European Union, and NGOs. They complete the course by framing their own legislative proposals to put Human Rights on a 21st-century footing. 

  • Students examine the British and American legal systems and how they reflect the values and institutions of their respective societies. Emphasis is placed on legal history and modes of thought, precedent-setting cases, current controversies, and the kind of first-hand courtroom observation that brings them to life. Each course includes visits to a court and sessions with lawyers. Major courses culminate in a formal moot court competition.

    Students examine the British and American legal systems and how they reflect the values and institutions of their respective societies. Emphasis is placed on legal history and modes of thought, precedent-setting cases, current controversies, and the kind of first-hand courtroom observation that brings them to life. Each course includes visits to a court and sessions with lawyers. Major courses culminate in a formal moot court competition.

  • Students gain a better understanding of what they have to offer, and how to take action and lead, regardless of their interests or career paths. Interactive workshops on goal-setting, communication, negotiation, and team-building, as well as a student-designed and led community service project, form the core of this course. Students learn from case studies drawn from history and business, meet with CEOs, officials, and politicians, and the heads of local nonprofit and advocacy organizations, to gain a perspective on what it takes to lead successfully in any arena.

  • The oceans are a scientific frontier that is in urgent need of deeper understanding. As Barcelona is a major seaport, students are able to combine trips to the coast with visits to the renowned Institut de Ciències del Mar and the city’s world-class aquarium. Course topics include indigenous marine life, the local ecosystem, species differentiation, engineering, coastal preservation, evolutionary biology, the environmental challenges the oceans face, and possible solutions.

  • This experiential course is intended to make students familiar with the fundamentals of engineering by introducing them to its different fields. Students learn how to utilize skills they already possess and apply them to various sets of engineering problems. They also become familiar with different types of engineering judgments in order to be able to adopt efficient solutions to problems. They complete the course by designing a model engineering project of their own. 

    This experiential course is intended to make students familiar with the fundamentals of engineering by introducing them to its different fields. They learn how to utilize skills they already possess and apply them to various sets of engineering problems. They also become familiar with different types of engineering judgments in order to be able to adopt efficient solutions to problems. They complete the course by designing a model engineering project of their own.

    Students learn the principles and mathematics that go into engineering science. Using local and world-famous examples, they apply principles of engineering to a variety of case studies to solve mathematical, mechanical, structural, design, and architectural problems. They complete the course by designing a model engineering project of their own.

  • How does math arise in and apply to nature? Students look at algebra, geometry, trigonometry, and calculus, and then examine the presence of math in the world by exploring phenomena like Fibonacci numbers and the Golden Ratio. Students are introduced to topics such as Newtonian physics and chaos, quantum, and string theory – Cambridge is at the forefront of thinking in all these subjects. 

  • This hands-on course introduces students to key aspects of medical science and modern medical practice. Combining specialist lectures with experiments and class discussions, students learn the principles of human anatomy and physiology, the pathology and significance of certain diseases, the main challenges that medical science faces today, and are introduced to the wide and growing range of possible careers in medicine. 

    This hands-on course introduces students to key aspects of medicine and modern medical practice. Combining specialist lectures with experiments and class discussions, students learn the main principles of human anatomy and physiology, the pathology and significance of certain diseases, the main challenges that medical science faces today, and the variety and changing nature of careers in medicine.

    Through a mixture of lectures, case studies, hospital visits, and practical sessions, this course introduces students to the principles and objectives of becoming a healthcare professional, introduces the general structure and function of the human body, the different systems involved in homeostasis, genetics, and genetic disorders, and concludes with topics for medical research and the future of medicine. 

    This hands-on course introduces students to key aspects of medical science and modern medical practice. Combining specialist lectures with experiments and class discussions, students learn the principles of human anatomy and physiology, the pathology and significance of certain diseases, the main challenges that medical science faces today, and are introduced to the wide and growing range of possible careers in medicine. 

    This hands-on course introduces students to key aspects of medicine and modern medical practice. Combining specialist lectures with experiments and class discussions, students learn the main principles of human anatomy and physiology, the pathology and significance of certain diseases, the main challenges that medical science faces today, and the variety and changing nature of careers in medicine.

  • This hands-on course introduces students to key aspects of medical science and modern medical practice. Combining specialist lectures with experiments and class discussions, students learn the main principles of human anatomy and physiology, the pathology and significance of certain diseases, discover the main challenges that medical science faces today, and examine the wide and growing range of possible careers in medicine. 

    Taking advantage of the University’s state-of-the-art School of Medicine, this hands-on course introduces students to key aspects of medical science and modern medical practice. Combining specialist lectures with experiments and class discussions, students discover the pathology and significance of certain diseases, the main challenges that medical science faces today, and are introduced to the wide and growing range of possible careers in medicine.

    A general introduction for students interested in a career as health-care professionals, this hands-on course includes an introduction to human anatomy, physiology, medical-history taking, aspects of physical examination, including learning to take Vital Signs, and introduction to neurosciences, brain function, and laboratory interpretation, all illustrated by reviews of clinical cases. Alongside, students present their own research regarding key controversies in medicine today.

    This hands-on course introduces students to key aspects of medicine and modern medical practice. Combining specialist lectures with experiments and class discussions, students learn the main principles of human anatomy and physiology, the pathology and significance of certain diseases, the main challenges that medical science faces today, and the variety and changing nature of careers in medicine.

    A general introduction for students interested in a career as health-care professionals, this hands-on course includes an introduction to human anatomy, physiology, medical-history taking, aspects of physical examination, including learning to take Vital Signs, and an introduction to neurosciences, brain function, and laboratory interpretation, all illustrated by reviews of clinical cases. Alongside, students present their own research regarding key controversies in medicine today. 

    This hands-on course introduces students to key aspects of medicine and modern medical practice. Combining specialist lectures with experiments and class discussions, students learn the main principles of human anatomy and physiology, the pathology and significance of certain diseases, the main challenges that medical science faces today, and the variety and changing nature of careers in medicine.

    This hands-on course introduces students to key aspects of medicine and modern medical practice. Combining specialist lectures with experiments and class discussions, students learn the main principles of human anatomy and physiology, the pathology and significance of certain diseases, the main challenges that medical science faces today, and the variety and changing nature of careers in medicine.

    This hands-on course introduces students to key aspects of medicine and modern medical practice. Combining specialist lectures with experiments and class discussions, students learn the main principles of human anatomy and physiology, the pathology and significance of certain diseases, the main challenges that medical science faces today, and the variety and changing nature of careers in medicine.

    This hands-on course introduces students to key aspects of medicine and modern medical practice. Combining specialist lectures with experiments and class discussions, students learn the main principles of human anatomy and physiology, the pathology and significance of certain diseases, the main challenges that medical science faces today, and the variety and changing nature of careers in medicine.

  • Students examine the development of medicine with a focus on neuroscience. They learn the main principles of cognitive psychology, neuroanatomy and neurophysiology, and clinical methods and practices, and study the technology behind such diagnostic tools as CT and MRI scanners. 

  • After reviewing molecular structure, cell biology, and the function and operation of genes and proteins, students analyze the factors underlying diseases and explore topics such as genetic engineering, cloning, and gene therapy. They visit laboratories, undertake experiments such as DNA extraction, and meet local experts. 

    Students begin by reviewing cell biology, the function and operation of genes and proteins, and molecular structure. This provides a platform on which to analyze college-level material such as cloning, diseases, genetic engineering, and gene therapy. At the same time they address the medical and ethical consequences of our ever-greater understanding of the cellular keys to life.

  • This course focuses on recent advances in molecular medicine and genetics. After reviewing the molecular structure and mechanisms of DNA, students analyze the genetic factors underlying diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer’s. They examine how information gained at the molecular level translates into treatments and address issues such as genetic engineering, cloning, and gene therapy. Prerequisites: One year each of Biology and Chemistry.

  • In the city of music publishers, this multidisciplinary course gets to grips with the mechanisms of the $50 billion global music industry, paying particular attention to how it generates profits in an age of changing listening habits. Alongside, the course mines anthropology, brain science, biology, history, and literature, not to mention practical experiments, to understand how it is that music has come to play such a core role in our lives: why and how it affects listeners, how our brains respond to and process music, how it is utilized by advertisers, movie-makers, and artists, and how it is affecting the way humanity understands itself and interacts.

  • Using cognitive, experimental, and clinical approaches, students explore the structure and function of the brain as it relates to cognitive process and behavior. Students address the principles of neuroscience, neurology, and psychiatry, learn select diagnostic techniques, and study brain injuries and mental disorders. Classroom experiments are complemented by visits to laboratories.

    Students are introduced to the principles of neuropsychology and the role that specific brain regions play in producing behavior. They cover a wide range of topics, from the history of neuropsychology, assessment, and neuroanatomy, to clinical disorders, using cases as illustration. Students acquire knowledge of the measurement of human behavior and how the brain is responsible for sensory, motor, and cognitive functions, such as attention, language, memory, and emotion. 

  • Working on St Andrews’ striking coastline, and exploiting the city’s unique oceanographic resources, students discover the adaptations, fragility, and resilience of marine life. What are the forces currently altering the oceans, and can marine life be preserved in spite of them? In pursuit of answers, students consider mankind’s changing use of the sea, issues of climate change and pollution, the introduction of alien species, evolutionary biology, and the impact of fishing practices on biodiversity. 

  • Students learn about the substances that medicate us. They discover how drugs are absorbed and metabolized and how they interact with receptors. Alongside they learn about how a demand for medication is identified, how it is developed, about technologies that are revolutionizing the field, and about the pressures so-called Big Pharma can bring to bear on patients and practitioners alike. 

  • By combining classroom work with experiments and lab visits, students are introduced to the principles behind the awe-inspiring breadth of physics, including motion, gravity, kinematics, classical mechanics, energy, electromagnetism, thermodynamics, and waves.

  • Students are exposed to the awe-inspiring breadth of Physics, including Newtonian mechanics, electromagnetism, and thermodynamics, as well as Einstein’s theory of relativity, quantum mechanics, and string theory. Touching on such diverse areas of knowledge, students look at theoretical advances in science as a means of imagining the future. Prerequisite: At least one year of Physics. 

    Students are exposed to university-level physics, including Newtonian mechanics, electromagnetism, and thermodynamics, Einstein’s theory of relativity, quantum mechanics, and string theory. Touching on such diverse areas of knowledge, students look at theoretical advances in science as a means of imagining the future. Prerequisite: At least one year of Physics.

  • What goals and methodologies, if any, do politicians around the world share in common with one another? To what extent are politicians able to change contemporary society? And how can the social sciences be used to explain electoral outcomes? Working on contrasting political systems, data analyses, domestic politics, international relations, and political philosophy, students learn the fundamentals of 21st-century politics.

    What goals and methodologies, if any, do politicians around the world share in common with one another? To what extent are politicians able to change contemporary society? And how can the social sciences be used to explain electoral outcomes? Working on contrasting political systems, data analyses, domestic politics, international relations, and political philosophy, students learn the fundamentals of 21st-century politics.

    What goals and methodologies, if any, do politicians around the world share in common with one another? To what extent are politicians able to change contemporary society? And how can the social sciences be used to explain electoral outcomes? Working on contrasting political systems, data analyses, domestic politics, international relations, and political philosophy, students learn the fundamentals of 21st-century politics.

    What goals and methodologies, if any, do politicians around the world share in common with one another? To what extent are politicians able to change contemporary society? And how can the social sciences be used to explain electoral outcomes? Working on contrasting political systems, data analyses, domestic politics, international relations, and political philosophy, students learn the fundamentals of 21st-century politics.

    What goals and methodologies, if any, do politicians around the world share in common with one another? To what extent are politicians able to change contemporary society? And how can the social sciences be used to explain electoral outcomes? Working on contrasting political systems, data analyses, domestic politics, international relations, and political philosophy, students learn the fundamentals of 21st-century politics.

  • Oxford’s famous undergraduate degree, Politics, Philosophy, and Economics (PPE), is adapted for our students. They examine the institutions and policies of modern Britain and contrast the British, American, European, and East Asian approaches to global problems. Students engage in practical exercises such as a fantasy stock portfolio competition and complete the month by participating in a mock Parliament.

  • This course focuses on the history of political thought, the evolution of Human Rights within it, and the state of Human Rights today. Students tackle contemporary issues such as economic disparity, mass migration, new technologies, policy making, political power, and terrorism. They also discover how different types of governments, NGOs, and supranational agencies such as the European Union, address Human Rights issues in practice. All this takes place in the city that is home to the United Nations.

  • Students discover how Scotland, Britain, and the EU interact. Blending political science, history, and topical issues, such as Scottish and English nationalisms, inequality, immigration, and government power, they examine how politics work in Britain and Europe and chart possible futures for the two Unions in the wake of the Brexit vote. A series of debates in a model European Parliament serves as the culminating event.

  • Students examine the behaviors, tastes, and technologies that influence the entertainment industry, commercial enterprise, and cultural trends – what we call pop culture. Fame and celebrity, fashion, music, dance, and popular protest are all examined as means of understanding consumption. Students explore their own notion of culture to gain perspectives on the forces that shape their lives.

  • Students investigate a wide range of psychological topics that include dreams, memory, consciousness, anxiety, body language, gender, and sexuality. As well as examining the history of the subject, select case histories, and various mental disorders, students are introduced to research methods and diverse analytical frameworks in order to design their own experiments under the guidance of specialists.

    Students investigate a wide range of psychological topics, including dreams, memory, consciousness, anxiety, body language, gender, and sexuality. Alongside, they uncover the history of the subject, study case histories, learn about various mental disorders, and different research methodologies. They go on to design their own experiments under the guidance of research specialists and practicing clinicians. 

    Students investigate a wide range of psychological topics, including dreams, memory, consciousness, anxiety, body language, gender, and sexuality. Alongside, they uncover the history of the subject, study cases, and are introduced to various disorders and different research methodologies. They go on to design their own experiments under the guidance of research specialists and practicing clinicians.

    In this survey course, students investigate a wide range of psychological topics including dreams, memory, consciousness, anxiety, body language, gender, sexuality, and education. As well as examining the history of the subject, select case histories, and various mental disorders, students are introduced to research methodologies and diverse analytical frameworks in order to design their own experiments. They come away from the course with a better understanding of the career options in this field and possible areas for further research. 

    Led by researchers engaged in cutting-edge work in experimental psychology, students address a different topic each morning. These include introductions to mental processes and problem solving, evolutionary psychology, clinical psychology, behaviorism, and psychoanalysis. In addition to surveying various fields, students learn how research projects are developed and experiments undertaken.

    Students investigate a wide range of psychological topics that include dreams, memory, consciousness, anxiety, body language, gender, and sexuality. As well as examining the history of the subject, select case histories, and various mental disorders, students are introduced to research methodologies and diverse analytical frameworks in order to design their own experiments under the guidance of research specialists and practicing clinicians.


    Led by researchers engaged in cutting-edge work in experimental psychology, students address a different topic each morning. These include introductions to mental processes and problem solving, evolutionary psychology, clinical psychology, behaviorism, and psychoanalysis. In addition to surveying various fields, students learn how research projects are developed and experiments undertaken.

    Led by researchers engaged in cutting-edge work in experimental psychology, students address a different topic each morning. These include introductions to mental processes and problem solving, evolutionary psychology, clinical psychology, behaviorism, and psychoanalysis. In addition to surveying various fields, students learn how research projects are developed and experiments undertaken.

    Led by researchers engaged in cutting-edge work in experimental psychology, students address a different topic each morning. These include introductions to mental processes and problem solving, evolutionary psychology, clinical psychology, behaviorism, and psychoanalysis. In addition to surveying various fields, students learn how research projects are developed and experiments undertaken.

    Students investigate a wide range of case histories, touching on dreams, memory, anxiety, body language, gender, and sexuality. At the same time, they conduct experiments and examine their findings under the guidance of practicing clinicians. They pay special attention to the evolution of psychology in Europe, tracing it back to Rousseau’s concept of stages of development and to Freud’s time in Paris. 

  • How will robots develop in the future? What roles might artificial intelligence have in education, entertainment, and healthcare? This course combines theory with practice to give students problem-solving skills and an understanding of analogue and digital electronics, hardware, microprocessors, and software. It culminates with the design and construction of their own robot. Materials fee of $150 US for the Major, $75 US for the Minor.

    How will robots develop in the future? What roles might artificial intelligence have in education, entertainment, and healthcare? This course combines theory with practice to give students problem-solving skills and an understanding of analogue and digital electronics, hardware, microprocessors, and software. It culminates with the design and construction of their own robot. Materials fee of $150 US for the Major, $75 US for the Minor. 

  • This course addresses cutting-edge issues at the fringes of science. Participants study advances in diverse areas, including atomic and molecular physics, artificial intelligence, astrophysics, genetic engineering, nanotechnology, particle physics, space travel, and stem-cell research. They identify the possible futures that science and technology are creating for humankind, and debate how these will affect our daily lives, our society, and our planet. 

  • This syllabus is built from the type of course typically taught on MBAs. Students learn to organize their lives, to create realistic schedules, to manage time-tables, and to define priorities. They learn how to collect and manage information, how to take notes, and how to condense and file them. They learn how to build their profiles, not least how to leverage their growing experience and expertise as they take their first steps into the job and university markets.

    This syllabus is built from the type of course typically taught on MBAs. Students learn to organize their lives, to create realistic schedules, to manage time-tables, and to define priorities. They learn how to collect and manage information, how to take notes, and how to condense and file them. They learn how to build their profiles, not least how to leverage their growing experience and expertise as they take their first steps into the job and university markets.

  • This course focuses on human behavior and individual development within a social context. Students are introduced to major themes, including stereotyping and prejudice, cross-cultural differences, the dynamics of cooperation and conflict, conformity and persuasion, attraction, and the role of the individual within the crowd. Through case studies and interactive experiments, participants gain an introduction to psychology and learn to analyze their own peer-group dynamics. 

    This course focuses on behavior and development in a social context. Students are introduced to major themes, including stereotyping and prejudice, cross-cultural differences, the dynamics of cooperation and conflict, conformity and persuasion, attraction, and the role of the individual in the crowd. Through case studies and interactive experiments, participants gain an introduction to psychology and learn to analyze their own peer-group dynamics.

  • This course reveals the inner workings of the $65 billion dollar global sports business. Sessions cover a wide range of topics including marketing and ticket sales, fan loyalty, corporate sponsorships, brand management, ownership, and legal and financial structures. The primary focus is on American sports including the NFL, MLB, NBA, and NHL, but the course also examines global models such as the Premiership, la Liga, the Olympics, and the FIFA World Cup. Students visit worldrenowned sports venues including Yankee Stadium and Madison Square Garden.

    Students learn about a discipline which is growing in popularity at the university level. They gain insight into the mechanics behind marketing and ticket sales, fan loyalty, corporate sponsorships, brand management, transfers, ownership, rights, and legal and financial structures. While the primary focus is on global models such as FIFA, the Premiership, la Liga, and the Olympics, the course also analyzes American sports. Students visit world-renowned venues including the largest stadium in Europe (FC Barcelona’s Camp Nou) and the Estadi Olímpic Lluís Companys, used for the 1992 Olympics. 

    This course reveals the inner-workings of the $65-billion dollar global sports business. Sessions cover a wide range of topics including marketing and ticket sales, fan loyalty, corporate sponsorships, brand management, ownership, and legal and financial structures. The primary focus is on American sports including the NFL, MLB, NBA, and NHL, but the course also examines global models such as the Premiership, la Liga, the Olympics, and the FIFA World Cup. Students visit world-renowned sports venues including the Staples Center and Dodger Stadium.

  • Combining specialist lectures with experiments and class discussions, and led by professionals, students discover some of the key elements of veterinary medicine, such as how inquiry into animal behavior, biochemistry, biology, nutrition, reproduction, and physiology, improve animal health, productivity, and welfare.  They also address the main challenges the discipline faces today, and learn about the variety of careers in the field. 

  • This course examines the spectacular diversity of animal forms and behavior in the natural world. Students take trips in the surrounding countryside, through nature trails, and to Cambridge University’s Museum of Zoology.  These complement coverage of molecular biology, natural selection, animal communication, theories of instinct and innate behavior, imprinting, predation, protection, and behavioral development.

Production & Workshop

  • The purpose of this course is to prepare students for auditioning at the professional level in Los Angeles. The course will aim to cover cold-reading, script analysis, character development, the Stanislavski Method, Meisner Technique, on-camera work, auditioning, monologues and business/ marketing for actors. Students also visit a studio and meet with professionals in the field.

  • In the home of Mad Men and Times Square’s neon lights, students discover the power of suggestion, persuasion, and product placement. Scouring New York for case studies and creative examples, they explore different types of advertising, and find out how new media are transforming the game. Using their creative skills, they study a range of design techniques and, having settled on a product, grow and run their own campaigns. Lab fee of $100 US for the Major.

  • Thanks to the digital revolution, a medium once mocked as the poor cousin of film has become a crucial component of the entertainment industry. Participants study the genre’s history from flip-books to Flash, via film, digital video, clay, and GIF. Alongside they write, story-board, and create their own animated short in a medium of their choosing under the guidance of a professional animator. Lab fee of $150 US  for the Major; $75 US for the Minor. 

  • Architecture is all around us - a fascinating subject encompassing art, design, history, math, and social sciences. This course offers students the chance to explore a unique discipline, which can open up many diverse career avenues. Paris is the perfect classroom to learn about two thousand years of architectural history, and the ways in which successive generations have responded to the changing needs of the city, its buildings, and parks. On-site workshops, combined with sketching and design exercises, discussions and written projects, familiarize students with the main schools of architecture and urban design, helping them to understand the contexts and challenges that defined them, and their impact on our daily lives. Through sketches, collages, models, and maps, students will develop invaluable new skills and ways of thinking, working towards an impressive final exhibition of their practical, contemporary designs for a site in Paris. Equipment fee of $175 US for Majors; $75 US for Minors.

    Barcelona is an architect’s dream: from Gothic churches to Modernist homes and buildings, the city boasts some of the world’s most distinctive edifices. Students discover two thousand years of urban development, from the Roman ruins in the city’s ancient Gothic Quarter, to Gaudí’s spectacular Modernismo, to FC Barcelona’s majestic stadium, while learning how to transform their own ideas into models. Materials fee of $175 US for the Major; $75 US for the Minor. 

    Cambridge’s beauty provides students with the perfect environment in which to find inspiration, appreciate architectural history and aesthetics, and improve their design and model-making skills. They develop a portfolio of sketches before turning ideas and designs into three-dimensional models to display in the program’s Arts Exhibition. Lab fee of $150 US for the Major; $75 US for the Minor. 

     

    With its stunning variety of architectural styles, Oxford provides students with the perfect environment to find inspiration, appreciate architectural history and aesthetics, and improve their design and model-making skills. They develop a portfolio of sketches before turning ideas and designs into three-dimensional models to display at the program exhibition. Materials fee of $150 US for the Major; $75 US for the Minor. 

    With its stunning variety of architectural styles, Oxford provides students with the perfect environment to find inspiration, appreciate architectural history and aesthetics, and improve their design and model-making skills. They develop a portfolio of sketches before turning ideas and designs into three-dimensional models to display at the program exhibition. Materials fee of $150 US for the Major; $75 US for the Minor.

    Cambridge’s beauty provides students with the perfect environment in which to find inspiration, appreciate architectural history and aesthetics, and improve their design and model-making skills. They develop a portfolio of sketches before turning ideas and designs into three-dimensional models to display in the program’s Arts Exhibition. Lab fee of $150 US for the Major; $75 US for the Minor. 

  • Working from case studies, and making the most of New York’s unrivaled business resources, students decipher the codes of successful business leadership, and discover what makes one entrepreneur succeed where another fails. By trying their hand at game theory and various negotiation tactics, they get to grips with managerial organization in all its forms. 

  • In the city that’s home to some of the most creative and top-earning agencies in the world, like RPA, Ignited, and David & Goliath, students discover the power of suggestion, persuasion, and product placement. Scouring LA for case studies and creative examples, they explore different types of advertising, branding, and find out how new media are transforming the game. Thinking through the relationships between advertisers, media platforms, and audiences, and drawing on their creative skills, they settle on a cause or product and create and run their own campaign.

  • Students leverage everyday instruments, such as smartphones, to gain insight into the theoretical foundations and concepts involved in modern computer systems, design and development frameworks, problem-solving, coding, and in Android and Apple application design, and web frameworks. They are exposed to, among others, Java, iOS App Design, Swift, and Objective-C as they identify a space in the market and design an app to fill it. Lab fee of $150 US for Major; $75 US for Workshop.

  • Students compose fiction and poetry under the guidance of a published writer, with Scotland’s rich literary history as their inspiration. They explore their own potential by experimenting with new forms and styles of writing. Successful authors give workshops in which students learn about the creative process and the practicalities of publication. Students develop a portfolio of their best writing and collaborate to design, edit, and publish a literary magazine.

    Students compose fiction and poetry under the guidance of a published writer, with Oxford’s rich literary history as their inspiration. They explore their own potential by experimenting with new forms and styles of writing. Successful authors give workshops in which students learn about the creative process and the practicalities of publication. Students develop a portfolio of their best writing and collaborate to design, edit, and publish a literary magazine.

    “We tell ourselves stories in order to live.” Students learn to tell stories, render their experiences, observations, and ideas into words. They learn the fundamentals of creative writing and read and write pieces of fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry, exploiting New York’s literary heritage and traditions while also treating the city as a source of inspiration and as a character in its own right. They participate in workshops, an integral component of any college level creative writing class. The course culminates in a reading at the program coffee house, as well as the production of a literary journal.

    Students compose fiction and poetry under the guidance of a published writer, with Cambridge’s rich literary history as their inspiration. They explore their own potential by experimenting with new forms and styles of writing. Successful poets and writers give workshops in which students learn about the creative process and the practicalities of publication. Students develop a portfolio of their best writing and collaborate to design, edit, and publish a literary magazine.

    Students compose fiction and poetry under the guidance of a published writer, with Cambridge’s rich literary history as their inspiration. They explore their own potential by experimenting with new forms and styles of writing. Successful poets and writers give workshops in which students learn about the creative process and the practicalities of publication. Students develop a portfolio of their best writing and collaborate to design, edit, and publish a literary magazine.

    Students compose fiction and poetry under the guidance of a published writer, with Oxford’s rich literary history as their inspiration. They explore their own potential by experimenting with new forms and styles of writing. Successful authors give workshops in which students learn about the creative process and the practicalities of publication. Students develop a portfolio of their best writing and collaborate to design, edit, and publish a literary magazine.

  • Students focus on Paris as a city full of stories and characters. Through images, short readings, and exercises, they draw inspiration from the city in order to hone and broaden their writing skills. Led by professional writers and guest speakers, the goal is to stimulate and inspire new writing as well as polish writing skills. Students visit evocative settings, such as Hemingway’s favorite café, Beckett’s tomb, or St. Genevieve’s statue in the Luxembourg Gardens, and attend readings by established poets and writers, in order to spur creativity. They edit and publish their best work in the program’s literary magazine. 

  • Students discover Spanish cuisine focusing first on different regional specialties like paella and gazpacho or pinchos, and secondly on the vital role that Barcelona has played, and continues to play, in the culinary world. Students visit markets, bakeries, butchers, and pastry shops, where they discover first-hand the culinary richness of the city. Students also prepare dishes that they share as a class and can recreate back at home. Materials fee of $300 US for the Major and $250 US for the Minor.

    “In France, cooking is a serious art form and a national sport.” Students discover French cuisine from the evolution of regional dishes and the invention of the café to the development of the modern food industry. Classroom sessions are enhanced by tastings in some of Paris’ most beloved bakeries and shops, as well as practical cooking sessions, during which students try their hand at French gastronomy.  Lab fee of $300 US for Majors; $250 US for Minors.

  • Taught by classically-trained actors and directors, and addressing areas as diverse as theory, technique, improvisation, voice, mime, movement, and script analysis, students master the nuances of Shakespearean verse and interpretation as they prepare for a full performance at the end of the program. From auditions and casting to the final curtain call, Major class students participate in a full-scale Shakespeare production in the same way as a professional repertory company. Production fee of $175 US for the Major.

     

    Taught by classically-trained actors and directors, and addressing areas as diverse as improvisation, mime, movement, script analysis, technique, theory, and voice, students master the nuances of Shakespearean verse and interpretation in order to prepare for a full performance at the end of the program. From auditions and casting to rehearsals and the final curtain call, Major class students participate in a full-scale production in the same way as a professional repertory company. Production fee of $175 US for Majors only. 

    Taught by classically-trained actors and directors, and addressing areas as diverse as theory, technique, improvisation, voice, mime, movement, and script analysis, students master the nuances of Shakespearean verse and interpretation as they prepare for a full performance at the end of the program. From auditions and casting to the final curtain call, Major class students participate in a full-scale Shakespeare production in the same way as a professional repertory company. Production fee of $175 US for the Major.

    Taught by classically-trained actors and directors, and addressing areas as diverse as improvisation, mime, movement, script analysis, technique, theory, and voice, students master the nuances of Shakespearean verse and interpretation in order to prepare for a full performance at the end of the program. From auditions and casting to rehearsals and the final curtain call, Major class students participate in a full-scale production in the same way as a professional repertory company. Production fee of $175 US for Majors only. 

  • Students navigate from the blank page to the catwalk via the raw piece of tissue and the factory floor, in the process visiting and interacting with some of the most famous flagship stores and their Garment District suppliers. They analyze brand strategy and consumer experience, and come to grips with the fundamentals of clothes and accessory design. The course culminates in a fashion show in which they display their creations. Materials fee of $100 US for the Major; $50 US for the Workshop.

    Using the city’s fashion resources, students are introduced to the history and modern processes of haute-couture. They become acquainted with the main facets of the business - from factory floor to shop floor to boutique - visit some of the most famous houses as well as their artisanal suppliers, and learn the basics of clothes and accessory design.  The course culminates in a fashion show in which the students première their creations. Materials fee of $100 US for Majors; $50 US for Minors.

  • Few cities are as creative and fashionable as Barcelona. Exploiting these extraordinary resources, students become fashionistas in their own right. By studying the artists and designers who have made Barcelona famous, and by meeting with local creators and entrepreneurs, they acquire the skills to design, create, and develop their own brands from scratch. They present their portfolios and creations at the end of the program. Materials fee of $100 US for the Major; $50 US for the Minor.

  • With a body of alumni that includes Francis Ford Coppola, Ben Stiller, and Rob Reiner, UCLA has established itself as a core contributor to the dream factory that is Hollywood. Led by professional screenwriters and directors, and taking advantage of the resources of the location, students brainstorm, write, and produce their own short films (fiction, non-fiction, documentary, or experimental), which they shoot with digital cameras and edit with professional software. They screen their films at the end of the program. Lab fee of $300 US for the Major; $150 US for the Workshop.

    Few cities have featured in as many classic films as New York. Following in the footsteps of Woody Allen, Baz Luhrmann, and Martin Scorsese, students brainstorm, conceive, write, and produce short films, which they shoot with digital video cameras and edit with professional software. They screen their films at the end of the program. Lab fee of $300 US for the Major; $150 US for the Workshop.

    With instruction from professionals, students work in small groups to brainstorm, conceive, write, and produce short films (fiction, non-fiction, documentary, or experimental), which they shoot with digital video cameras and edit with professional software. Students screen their films at the end of the program. Lab fee of $300 US for Majors; $150 US for Minors. 

    With instruction from professional screenwriters and directors, students work in small groups to brainstorm, conceive, write, and produce short films (fiction, non-fiction, documentary, or experimental), which they shoot with digital video cameras and edit with professional software. Students screen their films at the end of the program. Lab fee of $300 US for the Major; $150 US for the Minor.

  • Designed for all levels of expertise, this course explores a variety of media through which students engage imaginatively with New York. They receive formal instruction in, among others, oils, watercolor, pastel, pencil, charcoal, clay, video, photography, and collage, but spend most of their time outside the studio, capturing the visual splendor of New York. Students exhibit their best pieces at the end of the program. Materials fee of $250 US for the Major; $150 US for the Workshop.

  • Following an historical introduction to the idea of Human Rights, students are introduced to contrasting national legislations, to the treaties and customary laws that structure Human Rights internationally, and to the instruments devised to promote and protect them, such as the UN Declaration of Human Rights and the European Convention on Human Rights. Working through current crises, case recreation, as well as legal theory, and taking rapid social change into account, students devise a Charter for the 21st century.

  • This course introduces students to the various academic disciplines and theoretical tools that define International Relations. In addition to studying the history of nations and their interactions with one another, they tackle a range of contemporary case studies. These include the rise of ISIS and the war against them; the Syrian refugee crisis and the issues surrounding mass immigration; and the "Brexit" vote and its aftermath. Can the origins of these issues be unraveled in such a way as to find new ways forward with them? This question is posed in the city that hosts the United Nations, and whose financial sector continues to have a massive influence on world affairs. 

  • Students become full-time journalists, acquiring and perfecting their research, composition, editing, and formatting skills as they publish a class magazine and blog. They address key topics in contemporary journalism as well as ethical issues surrounding journalistic responsibility and risk. Interview access to outstanding guest speakers deepens this fascinating introduction to the world of the working journalist. Production fee of $100 US for the Major; $50 US for the Minor.

  • Responding to the dramatic rise in popularity of digital media, students analyze the new ways in which we obtain and process information. They learn the fundamentals of investigative reporting, data visualization and analysis, and social media for journalists. As a class, they create and run a news website. Production fee of $100 US for the Major; $50 US for the Minor. 

  • This course covers the fundamentals of investigative reporting: writing a news story, cultivating a beat, and the art of interviewing. Alongside it examines how social media and new technologies, not to mention the way information is processed, have altered the reporter’s toolkit. How is journalism offering exciting new opportunities? And what are the challenges – not least the problems of truth and objectivity in an age of fake news? The class creates a digital magazine as it comes to grips with modern reporting. Production fee of $100 US for the Major; $50 US for the Workshop.

  • This hands-on course introduces students to key aspects of medicine and modern medical practice. Combining specialist lectures with experiments and class discussions, students learn the main principles of human anatomy and physiology, the pathology and significance of certain diseases, the main challenges that medical science faces today, and the variety and changing nature of careers in medicine.

  • Through a combination of discussions, guest speakers, and visits to industry institutions, this course introduces students to the history of the film and television industry, its current state, and addresses the challenges under which it is burdened. Students are taught how movies and TV shows are made, from idea conception to delivery. Specifically, they gain knowledge of the 3-act structure for film and the 5-act structure for television. They leave the program with an overall understanding of the U.S. Entertainment Industry while also having the skills to compose, pitch, give and receive constructive criticism from their peers on their unique story idea.

  • With workshops and masterclasses covering theory, technique, improvisation, voice, mime, movement, and script analysis, and from auditions and casting to rehearsals and the final curtain call, Major class students plan, rehearse, and put on a show that they perform at the end of the course. Students also attend a selection of Broadway shows. Production fee of $300 US for the Major; $150 US for the Workshop.

  • Photographers of all levels of expertise spend much of their time in the field, pursuing assignments designed to improve their landscape, portraiture, art, and fashion photography skills. Students exhibit their best work at the end of the program. They require their own DSLR camera with USB cable, charger, manual, and at least one 8 GB memory card. Lab fee of $175 US for the Major; $100 US for the Minor. 

    From the top of Montmartre to the winding Canal Saint Martin, beginners as well as more advanced students are guided by a professional photographer as they transform the city into their private studio. They hone their skills on assignments that cover art, photography, essay, landscape, photojournalism, portraiture, and learn to develop their own photos in the school’s darkroom. Students build up a portfolio and their best work is displayed at the final exhibition. They need a 35mm reflex camera. Film is supplied. Lab fee of $300 US for the Major; $150 US for the Minor.

    This course is an introduction to digital photography. Its primary objective is to learn how completely to operate and control cameras in the manual setting, utilizing F-Stop, Shutter, and ISO in order to achieve effects such as freezing and dragging motion, soft and sharp focus, and long exposure/night photography. Students achieve this while covering the traditional elements of photography such as portraiture, still life, landscape, and, in New York, street photography, as well as learning about key photographers past and present. The class culminates in an exhibition. Students need to bring their own DSLR camera with USB cable, charger, manual, and at least one 8GB memory card. Lab fee of $175 US for the Major; $75 US for the Workshop.

    Photographers of all levels of expertise spend much of their time in the field, pursuing assignments designed to improve their landscape, portraiture, art, and fashion photography skills. Students exhibit their best work at the end of the program. They require their own DSLR camera with USB cable, charger, manual, and at least one 8 GB memory card. Lab fee of $175 US for the Major; $100 US for the Minor.

    Students receive guidance in artistic, landscape, and portraiture photography. This helps them record their exploration of England and its culture, and to produce a comprehensive photographic record of their experiences. The class culminates in a formal exhibition. Students need their own DSLR camera with USB cable, charger, and at least one 8 GB memory card.  Materials fee of $175 US for Majors; $75 US for Minors.

    An introduction to photography in which students learn to use their camera's manual shutter speed, aperture, and ISO settings to control exposure and effects. They learn composition and lighting, and experiment with angle, framing, lens choice, and exposure. They present their work and learn how to give and receive criticism. Using LA as their backdrop, they practice different styles of photography. Finally, each student curates a selection of photographs to exhibit in a final show. Students need to bring their own DSLR camera with USB cable, charger, manual, and at least one 8GB memory card. Lab fee of $175 US for the Major; $75 US for the Workshop.


    Students receive guidance in artistic, landscape, and portraiture photography. This helps them record their exploration of England and its culture, and to produce a comprehensive photographic record of their experiences. The class culminates in a formal exhibition. Students need their own DSLR camera with USB cable, charger, and at least one 8 GB memory card.  Materials fee of $175 US for Majors; $75 US for Minors.

    Students acquire the creative techniques required to become a photographer. Making full use of the historic location, framed by areas of stunning natural beauty, they learn an array of photographic processes. They go on to pursue their own interests as they build up their personal porfolio. The course culminates in an exhibition. Students require their own DSLR camera with USB cable, charger, manual, and at least one 8 GB memory card. Materials fee of $175 US for the Major; $75 US for the Minor.

    Beginners and experienced photographers transform Barcelona into their private studio, honing their skills on assignments that cover portraiture, urban landscapes, photojournalism, and art photography. All students exhibit their best work at the end of the program. Students need to bring their own DSLR camera with USB cable, charger, manual, and at least one 8GB memory card. Lab fee of $175 US for the Major; $75 US for the Minor. 

  • Led by researchers engaged in cutting-edge work in experimental psychology, students address a different topic each morning. These include introductions to mental processes and problem solving, evolutionary psychology, clinical psychology, behaviorism, and psychoanalysis. In addition to surveying various fields, students learn how research projects are developed and experiments are undertaken. 

  • In 21st century working life, everyone will at some point be asked to deliver a presentation, regardless of their occupation. Being an effective and persuasive speaker requires flawless communication skills – verbal, nonverbal, and written. Students learn how to prepare and deliver compelling speeches to large and critical audiences. The syllabus covers the core principles of communication, the history and theory of rhetoric, and techniques for overcoming speech anxiety. Students learn how to structure and organize information, gain decision-making skills, and knowledge of how to present their ideas effectively.

  • In 21st-century working life, everyone will at some point be asked to deliver a presentation, regardless of their occupation. Being an effective and persuasive speaker requires flawless communication skills – verbal, nonverbal, and written. Students learn how to prepare and deliver compelling speeches to a large and critical audience. The syllabus covers the core principles of communication, the history and theory of rhetoric, and techniques for overcoming speech anxiety. Students gain a sense of how to structure and organize information, and acquire decision-making skills and knowledge of how to present their ideas effectively.

  • This course introduces students to the principles of writing for the screen, focusing on the construction of strong characters, story development, and 3-act narrative structure. Through practical exercises, students develop an original idea for a feature script and learn to shape it into pitch and treatment format. Professionals address the class, offering insight into Hollywood and best practices for presenting work to agents, producers, and studios.


    Using examples drawn from a wide range of fiction, students discover how screenwriters interpret, innovate, and reinvent original works. They also look at how adaptations shape the perceptions of an audience, examine parodies of original texts, ideas, and genres, and conclude the course by scripting and storyboarding their own adaptations of a famous work. 

  • Students practice major debating styles and strategies, engage in daily speaking exercises, orations and dialogues, and prepare and present regular debates. The culmination of the course is a formal debate in the historic debating chamber of The Cambridge Union Society. It is the oldest of its kind in the world, having been founded in 1815. 

    Students explore major debating styles and strategies, engage in daily speaking exercises, orations, and dialogues, and prepare and present regular debates. The culmination of the course is a formal debate in the historic debating chamber of the Oxford Union Society, founded in 1823 and one of the oldest university debating societies in the world.

    Students explore major debating styles and strategies, engage in daily speaking exercises, orations, and dialogues, and prepare and present regular debates. The culmination of the course is a formal debate in the historic debating chamber of the Oxford Union Society, founded in 1823 and one of the oldest university debating societies in the world.

  • From elocution to forming a convincing argument, this course provides students with a practical and diverse range of public speaking skills. Classwork also focuses on preparing and presenting regular debates on a variety of controversial topics related to New York and the United States. The course culminates in a formal debate judged by a panel of professionals.

  • In this course, students spend their time capturing sights such as Notre Dame, masterpieces at the Musée Rodin, or a street scene in Montmartre. They hone their technique in a variety of media including watercolor, pastel, pencil, and charcoal. Their best work is exhibited at the end of the program. Materials fee of $250 US for Majors; $150 US for Minors.

    Beginners and more advanced students receive instruction in a variety of media. They spend much of their time outside, sketching medieval towers, capturing pastoral landscapes, practicing their portrait skills, or discovering masterpieces in locations such as the Christ Church Picture Gallery. Students exhibit their best pieces at the end of the program. Materials fee of $250 US for the Major; $150 US for the Minor. 

    Beginners and more advanced students receive instruction in a variety of media. They spend much of their time outside, sketching medieval towers, capturing pastoral landscapes, practicing their portrait skills, or discovering masterpieces in locations such as the Christ Church Picture Gallery. Students exhibit their best pieces at the end of the program. Materials fee of $250 US for the Major; $150 US for the Minor. 

    Students on this course spend much of their time outside the studio. They sketch medieval towers, capture pastoral landscapes, practice their portrait skills, and discover masterpieces in locations like the Fitzwilliam Museum. Meanwhile they receive formal, professional instruction in sketching and painting in a variety of media. Their best work is exhibited at the end of the program. Materials fee of $250 US for Majors; $150 US for Minors.

     

    Students on this course spend much of their time outside the studio. They sketch medieval towers, capture pastoral landscapes, practice their portrait skills, and discover masterpieces in locations like the Fitzwilliam Museum. Meanwhile they receive formal, professional instruction in sketching and painting in a variety of media. Their best work is exhibited at the end of the program. Materials fee of $250 US for Majors; $150 US for Minors.

    In this course, students spend their time capturing sights such as Parc Guell, Sagrada Familia, the Gothic quarter, masterpieces in the Picasso Museum, and the sparkling Mediterranean coastline. They hone their technique in a variety of media such as watercolor, pastel, pencil, and charcoal. Their best work is exhibited at the end of the program. Materials fee of $250 US for the Major; $150 US for the Minor.

Courses Taught in French

  • Ce cours invite les étudiants à utiliser les arts plastiques comme moyen d’expression face à la ville qu’ils découvrent. Après une initiation à différents médias tels l’aquarelle, le pastel, l’huile, le crayon, le fusain, et la photographie, les étudiants parcourent la ville et livrent leurs impressions sur papier. Ils croquent les passants à la Place de la Comédie, ils font des esquisses au Musée Fabre, peignent les petites places et ruelles médiévales, et font des collages de leurs œuvres et photos. Les élèves s’initient également à différentes disciplines à travers des ateliers (sculpture, sérigraphie, céramique, linogravure, etc.) et constituent un portfolio qu’ils présentent à la fin du programme.  Supplément de $250 US pour la classe Majeure et de $150 US pour la classe Mineure.

    Visual Arts. This course invites students to discover the city through the visual arts. After an introduction to different media such as watercolor, pastel, oil, pencil, charcoal, and photography, students keep an artistic record of their explorations of Montpellier. They capture passersby in the Place de la Comédie, sketch in the Musée Fabre, paint the small squares and medieval streets, and make collages using their photographs. At the end of the course, students compile a portfolio that reflects their artistic interaction with and intimate knowledge of the city. Supplementary fee of $250 US for Majors; $150 US for Minors.

  • Ce cours permet aux étudiants de faire connaissance avec un éventail d’auteurs francophones ainsi que d’expérimenter avec les processus d’écriture. L’objectif, à travers la découverte de textes et l’exploration de la ville, est de stimuler l’imagination et la créativité des étudiants pour leur permettre de s’exprimer en s’essayant à différents genres.

    Creative Writing. In this course, students study a broad range of Francophone authors and explore the writing process.  Through the discovery of new texts and the exploration of the city, this course stimulates the students’ imagination and creativity by allowing them to express themselves through different writing styles.

  • Through a series of workshops, students acquaint themselves with different techniques and media to depict their picturesque surroundings. They present their portfolio at the end of the program. Materials fee $150 US.

  • Les étudiants découvrent les trésors de la cuisine régionale (fromages, ratatouille, tartes), ainsi que l’histoire de la cuisine française à travers les œuvres de Vatel, Escoffier, Brillat-Savarin, et Julia Child. Aux cours s’ajoutent de nombreuses visites et dégustations qui témoignent du haut niveau de la gastronomie montpelliéraine. Les étudiants participent à une série d’ateliers en cuisine sous la direction d’un grand chef de Montpellier. Ils rentrent chez eux avec un beau carnet de recettes. Supplément de $300 US pour la classe Majeure et de $250 US pour la classe Mineure.

    Culture and Cuisine. Students discover the delicacies of the region (cheeses, ratatouille, tarts), and they learn about the history of French cuisine, by studying such famed culinary experts as Vatel, Escoffier, Brillat-Savarin, and Julia Child. Classroom sessions are enhanced by visits to local markets, butchers, and pastry shops which bear witness to the outstanding gastronomy of Montpellier. In the last week of the program, several sessions are taught in the kitchens of one of the city's top chefs. They return home with a journal of recipes that they can continue to enjoy. Lab fee of $300 US for Majors; $250 US for Minors.

  • Through a series of participatory workshops on film, pop-culture, music, art, and current affairs, students engage with the cultures that make modern France. 

  • For students with two or more years of French

    Taking full advantage of Montpellier, and using innovative and interactive teaching methods, this course offers a review of tenses and structures, as well as vocabulary-building exercises with a strong focus on conversational proficiency. Language learning is approached through a variety of activities, such as storytelling and role playing, and short thematic units that integrate museums and cultural sites, and bring students into contact with local native speakers. Students work on pronunciation, intonation, and public speaking. They are evaluated on the first day and placed in a group with others of a similar level. 

    Conversation and Composition Minors:

    Beaux-Arts

    Through a series of workshops, students acquaint themselves with different techniques and media to depict their picturesque surroundings. They present their portfolio at the end of the program. Materials fee $150 US.

    Cultures françaises

    Through a series of participatory workshops on film, pop-culture, music, art, and current affairs, students engage with the cultures that make modern France.

    Gastronomie

    Through cooking workshops and visits to local bakeries, markets, and stores, students learn the history and evolution of French cuisine, and taste the culinary treasures of the region.  Lab fee $150 US.

    Taking full advantage of the city of Paris, and using innovative and interactive teaching methods, this course offers a review of tenses and structures, as well as vocabulary-building exercises with a strong focus on conversational proficiency. Language learning is approached through a variety of activities, such as storytelling and role playing, and short thematic units that integrate museums and cultural sites, and bring students into contact with local native speakers. Students work on pronunciation, intonation, and public speaking. They are evaluated on the first day and placed in a group with others of a similar level.

  • Through cooking workshops and visits to local bakeries, markets, and stores, students learn the history and evolution of French cuisine, and taste the culinary treasures of the region.  Lab fee $150 US.

  • A travers des visites journalières de musées, de galeries, de sites historiques dans la région, ainsi qu’à travers des cours de théorie, les élèves acquièrent les outils nécessaires pour lire, décrire, et évaluer une œuvre d’art. Le cours couvre toutes les périodes: l’antiquité, le médiéval, la Renaissance, le baroque, le classique, le romantisme, le réalisme, le modernisme, et toutes les formes d’expression artistique, telles la peinture, la sculpture, l’architecture ou la photographie.

    Art History. Through daily visits to the region’s museums, galleries, and historic sites, as well as through courses on theory, students acquire the tools to read, describe, and evaluate a work of art. The course covers all the periods: antiquity, the middle ages, the Renaissance, the baroque, the classical, romanticism, modernism, and all forms of artistic expression, including painting, sculpture, architecture, and photography.

    S’appuyant sur les grandes collections parisiennes - le Louvre, Orsay, Rodin, Pompidou - les élèves apprennent à lire, décrire et évaluer une oeuvre d’art, leur permettant de comprendre le processus créateur de l’artiste ainsi que les réactions souvent violentes que l’oeuvre peut avoir suscitées. Le cours couvre tous les grands mouvements artistiques. 

    Art History. Taking full advantage of the world-famous Parisian art collections - the Louvre, Orsay, Rodin, Pompidou, and more - students learn to read, describe and evaluate a work of art through a multidisciplinary approach and gain an understanding of its value both existentially and historically. This approach permits students to uncover the creative process of the artist, as well as the often violent reactions the work provoked when it first appeared. This course covers all of the major artistic movements.

  • Pour tenter de comprendre la France contemporaine, les étudiants se tournent vers la vieille France. A travers un mélange de visites, de séminaires, et d’études de textes et d’objets d’art, ils découvrent les origines des succès et des problèmes auxquels la France se confronte au début du 21eme siècle. En étudiant la Révolution, le colonialisme, les guerres mondiales, la Guerre d’Algérie, l’immigration, et mai ‘68, ils transforment l’histoire en laboratoire analytique et critique et se mettent au centre de la problématique de la France et de l’Europe.   

    Pour tenter de comprendre la France contemporaine, les étudiants se tournent vers la vieille France. A travers un mélange de visites, de séminaires, et d’études de textes et d’objets d’art, ils découvrent les origines des succès et des problèmes auxquels la France se confronte au début du 21eme siècle. En étudiant la Révolution, le colonialisme, les guerres mondiales, la Guerre d’Algérie, l’immigration, et mai ‘68, ils transforment l’histoire en laboratoire analytique et critique et se mettent au centre de la problématique de la France et de l’Europe.   

    France facing its history. In order to gain a greater understand of contemporary France, students turn towards its history, la vieille France. Through visits, seminars, and studies of texts and works of art, students discover the origins of the successes and also the issues France is dealing with in the 21st century. By studying the Revolution, colonialism, the World Wars, the Algerian War, immigration, and May ‘68, they transform history into an analytical laboratory and put themselves at the center of the current problematic of France and Europe.

     

  • Montpellier, dont la faculté de médecine compte parmi les plus anciennes d’Europe, est la destination rêvée pour les étudiants qui envisagent une carrière médicale. Dans ce cours, ils apprennent à établir l’histoire d’un patient et à mener un examen clinique; ils débattent de questions éthiques telles que l’euthanasie et le clonage et s’essaient à certaines pratiques médicales comme la dissection et l’extraction d’ADN. Ils examinent les médecines dites « douces » ainsi que de nouvelles formes de thérapie comme la musicothérapie. Ils visitent également le centre de médecine sportive et le célèbre Musée d’Anatomie de Montpellier.

    Medicine. Montpellier, whose medical school is counted among the oldest in Europe, is a dream destination for students aspiring to a medical career. In this course, they learn to take a patient’s medical history and conduct a clinical exam; they debate difficult ethical questions related to euthanasia and cloning and try their hand at various medical practices like dissections and DNA extractions. They discover alternative medicine such as musicotherapy and other new forms of therapy. Students also visit the sports medicine center and the famous Anatomy Museum of Montpellier.

  • Paris a inspiré les plus célèbres artistes, cinéastes, écrivains, et créateurs. Parfois la ville lumière joue un rôle principal dans leur œuvre, parfois elle n’est que son inspiration. A travers ce cours pluridisciplinaire -- qui allie promenades en ville, visites de musées, films, lectures, et exercices d’écriture -- les étudiants découvrent comment Paris a été imaginé et représenté par différents artistes, tout en travaillant leurs propres créations multimédia. 

    Paris: City of Imagination. Paris has inspired the world’s most famous artists, filmmakers, writers, designers, and performers. Sometimes the city of lights has featured as the star of their work, and at other times it has simply been the inspiration behind it. In this interdisciplinary course that combines walking tours, museum visits, film screenings, readings, and writing exercises, students discover and analyze the various ways in which Paris has been depicted and brought to life in artists’ work while simultaneously creating their own multimedia Paris portfolios.

  • Ce cours avancé d’expression orale et écrite s’adresse aux étudiants qui veulent enrichir leur vocabulaire et approfondir leur connaissance de la grammaire française et de ses complexités, tels que l’emploi du subjonctif et du conditionnel, la concordance des temps et le choix des pronoms personnels et relatifs. Les étudiants lisent la presse nationale et regardent des extraits de films contemporains, ils discutent de questions de société et de sujets d’actualité, et s’initient à l’art du débat. Ils s’essaient à différents types d’écriture et créent un portefeuille qu’ils présentent à la fin du programme.

    Perfecting the Language. This advanced course focusing on oral and written expression is designed for students who wish to enrich their vocabulary and improve their understanding of French grammar and its complexities, such as the use of the subjunctive and the conditional tenses, verb tense agreement and the choice of personal and relative pronouns. Students read the national press and examine excerpts from contemporary films, they discuss current events and social issues and are introduced to the art of debate. They work on different types of writing and create a portfolio that they present at the end of the program.

    Ce cours avancé d’expression orale et écrite s’adresse aux étudiants qui veulent enrichir leur vocabulaire et approfondir leur connaissance de la grammaire française et de ses complexités tels que l’emploi du subjonctif et du conditionnel, la concordance des temps et le choix des pronoms personnels et relatifs. Les étudiants lisent la presse régionale et nationale et regardent des extraits de films contemporains, ils discutent de questions de société et de sujets d’actualité et s’initient à l’art du débat. Ils s’essaient à différents types d’écriture et créent un portefeuille qu’ils présentent à la fin du programme.

    Perfecting the Language. This advanced writing and oral expression course is intended for students who want to enrich their vocabulary and deepen their understanding of the complexities of French grammar – the use of the subjunctive and conditional tenses, agreement, and personal and relative pronouns.  Students read the local and national news, watch excerpts of contemporary films, discuss important societal and current event issues and learn about the art of debate.  They explore different writing styles and create a portfolio that they present at the end of the program.

  • En parcourant les ruelles médiévales de Montpellier et le Jardin des Plantes, photographes débutants et expérimentés transforment la ville en leur studio privé afin de parfaire leur talent au travers de projets couvrant portraits, paysages urbains, photojournalisme, et photographie d’art. Les étudiants exposent leur meilleur travail à la fin du programme. Les étudiants doivent emporter leur propre appareil photo DSLR, avec son câble USB, chargeur, et au moins une carte mémoire de 8GB. Supplément de $75 US pour la classe.

    Photography. Beginners and experienced photographers transform the city into their private studio, honing their skills on assignments that cover portraiture, urban landscapes, photojournalism, and art photography. All students exhibit their best work at the end of the program. Students need to bring their own DSLR camera with USB cable, charger, manual, and at least one 8GB memory card. Lab fee of $75 US.

  • Face aux crises qui dominent l’actualité - la terreur, l’immigration, Brexit - les étudiants  travaillent à comprendre le fonctionnement et les enjeux de la politique mondiale. Ils découvrent les théories et écoles de pensée des relations internationales - les écoles réaliste, marxiste, libérale, et néolibérale - et les applique aux grandes questions du. A l’aide d’une série d’études de cas spécifiques, menées par des experts en la matière, les étudiants sont ensuite amenés à organiser leur propre sommet traitant d’un important problème d’actualité.

    International Relations. In the face of crises that dominate our newsfeeds - terror, immigration, Brexit - students work to understand the complexity of the relationships at play in world politics. They become familiar with the principal theoretical models that govern international relations - realism, marxism, liberalism, and neoliberalism - and apply them to the challenges of today. Thanks to a series of case studies led by experts in the field, students go on to organize a mock summit focusing on a critical current issue.


     

Courses Taught in Spanish

  • Through a series of workshops, students acquaint themselves with different techniques and media to depict their picturesque surroundings. They present their portfolio at the end of the program. Materials fee $125 US.

  • Este curso interdisciplinario examina el arte, la arquitectura, la literatura, la música, la gastronomía y las últimas modas que han dado forma a Barcelona a lo largo del último siglo. Desde el movimiento de Modernismo a finales del siglo a la Guerra Civil Española y acontecimientos más recientes, como la incorporación de España en la Unión Europea y la Olimpiada de 1992, Barcelona se ha vuelto un actor importante en la escena mundial. Las clases suponen lecturas, conferenciantes invitados, y visitas a museos y estudios de arte contemporáneo, con la meta de familiarizar a los estudiantes con los artistas e intelectuales más notables - de Gaudí y Miró a el tenor José Carreras y el célebre chef Ferran Adrià - cuyas contribuciones han influido, y siguen influyendo, Barcelona.  

    Barcelona and Modern Culture. This interdisciplinary course examines the art, architecture, literature, music, cuisine and latest trends that have shaped Barcelona over the last century. From the Modernismo movement at the turn of the century to the Spanish Civil War and more recent events, such as Spain's acceptance into the European Union and the 1992 Olympics, Barcelona has become a significant player on the world stage. Classes involve readings, guest speakers, and visits to contemporary art studios and museums, with the aim of introducing students to the most notable artists and thinkers – from Gaudí and Miró to the tenor José Carreras and the celebrated chef Ferran Adrià – whose contributions have shaped, and continue to shape, Barcelona.

  • De la mano de un artista, los estudiantes se inician en distintas técnicas como la acuarela, el óleo, el carboncillo, el modelaje con arcilla, o el grabado, con las que plasman su relación artística con la ciudad. La práctica del arte se complementa con visitas a talleres de artistas y artesanos de la ciudad, como ceramistas o escultores. Por su trabajo final, los estudiantes recopilan un portafolio que presentan al final del programa. La cuota de laboratorio es de $225 US para la clase Principal, y de $125 US por la clase Complementaria.

    Fine Arts. This course invites students to use the fine arts as a medium of expression in their discovery of the city of Salamanca. After an introduction to different techniques including watercolors, oil painting, charcoal, and photography, students explore the city and capture their impressions on paper. They sketch passersby in the Plaza Mayor, traverse the streets of the historic center and make collages of their artworks and photos. For their final project, students compile a portfolio which they present at the end of the program. Materials fee of $225 US for Majors; $125 US for Minors.

  • Los alumnos se familiarizan con los elementos clave de las diversas culturas hispánicas, sus diferencias y sus puntos en común. El estudio se aborda a través de la historia, el arte, la literatura y la lengua. Mediante visitas a lugares históricos de la ciudad los estudiantes descubren la importancia de Salamanca en el gran encuentro de culturas que supuso el descubrimiento de América. Los estudiantes mejoran su español al mismo tiempo que aprenden a identificar los principales dialectos del español gracias a textos y documentos audiovisuales.

    Hispanic Cultures. Students become familiar with the key elements of the various Hispanic cultures, their differences and their commonalities. This is done through studying the history, art, literature and the language of Spain. Through visits to historical sites of the city, students discover the importance of Salamanca in the great meeting of cultures that marked the discovery of America. Students improve their Spanish while learning to identify the main dialects of Spanish through texts and audiovisual documents.

  • De la mano de chefs, críticos gastronómicos, nutricionistas e historiadores, esta asignatura es un placer para los sentidos. Los estudiantes ganan confianza con el español mezclándose con locales visitando mercados, panaderías, pastelerías y carnicerías. Los estudiantes descubren la rica diversidad gastronómica española y catalana, de gran relevancia en la actualidad, pues cocineros españoles como Ferrán Adrià y los hermanos Roca son reconocidos mundialmente. Al mismo tiempo los alumnos aprenden sobre la dieta mediterránea y sus bondades para la salud. La cuota de laboratorio es de $300 US para la clase Major; $250 US para la clase Minor.

    Culture and Cuisine. Students learn about the history of Spanish cuisine by focusing both on regional specialties such as paella, Andalusian gazpacho, and pintxos, and on the role that Barcelona has come to play in the culinary world. Students gain confidence in their Spanish skills via regular visits to Barcelona's produce markets, including the spectacular Boquería, built in 1836, pasteleríascarnicerías, and panaderías, and while learning to make the most beloved and delicious traditional Spanish delicacies. In the last week of the program, students participate in several hands-on cooking workshops given by local experts. Lab fee of $300 US for Majors; $250 US for Minors.

    De la mano de chefs, críticos gastronómicos e historiadores, esta asignatura es un placer para los sentidos. En ella se explora la evolución de la cocina, especialmente española, desde la Edad Media, con la incorporación de la cocina árabe y judía y el cultivo de especias; pasando por la Edad Moderna, con la introducción de ingredientes del Nuevo Mundo y las influencias de la cocina europea; y hasta la actualidad, en la que cocineros españoles como Ferrán Adrià, los hermanos Roca o José Andrés son reconocidos mundialmente. Los estudiantes ganan confianza con el español mientras se mezclan con locales visitando mercados, panaderías, pastelerías y carnicerías, y aprenden a cocinar los platos más conocidos de la rica gastronomía de España. La cuota de laboratorio es de $275 US por la clase Principal, y de $125 US por la clase Complementaria.

    Culture and Cuisine. Students learn about the history of Spanish cuisine by focusing on the role of food in Spanish culture and by exploring regional specialties such as Valencian paella, Andalusian gazpacho, and Basque pintxos. Students gain confidence in their Spanish skills while visiting local markets, bakeries, butcher shops, and learning how to make the most beloved and delicious traditional Spanish delicacies. Lab fee of $275 US for Majors; $125 US for Minors.

  • Este curso está diseñado para que los estudiantes desarrollen sus habilidades lingüísticas y creativas en un entorno extraordinario como es la ciudad de Salamanca. Descubriendo las iglesias, palacios, monumentos, barrios y cafés que han formado parte del decorado de relatos, leyendas, novelas y poemas, los alumnos dan rienda suelta a la imaginación y crean su propia relación literaria en un escenario nuevo y extraño, dejando huella de tales impresiones en un diario de viaje que sin duda les acompañará toda la vida. 

    Creative Writing. Students develop their linguistic and creative skills in the extraordinary environment of Salamanca. While exploring the churches, palaces, monuments, neighborhoods, and cafés that have long been the setting for stories, legends, novels and poems, students unleash their imagination and create their own literary relationship with a new and foreign scenery. Students leave Salamanca with a travel diary filled with the impressions that will undoubtedly accompany them throughout their life.  

  • En este curso los estudiantes desarrollan su propia visión fotográfica de Barcelona y se sumergen en las riquezas visuales de la ciudad, como la arquitectura y el arte callejero. Tanto los principiantes como los fotógrafos más avanzados hacen de la ciudad su estudio; trabajan el retrato, el paisaje urbano, el fotoperiodismo y la fotografía artística. Al final del programa los estudiantes exponen sus mejores trabajos. Los estudiantes necesitan una cámara digital con cable USB, cargador, manual y tarjeta de 8GB. La cuota de laboratorio es de $100 US para la clase Minor.

    Photography. Students transform the city of Barcelona into their private studio, honing their skills on assignments that cover portraiture, urban art, photojournalism, and art photography. All students exhibit their best work at the end of the program. Students need to bring their own digital camera with USB cable, charger, manual, and at least one 8GB memory card. Lab fee of $100 US for the Minor.

  • Through cooking workshops and visits to local bakeries, markets, and stores, students learn the history and evolution of Spanish cuisine, and taste the culinary treasures of the region. Lab fee $125 US.  

  • A partir de las numerosas y variadas manifestaciones artísticas que ofrece la ciudad, los estudiantes se adentran en la evolución del arte a través del tiempo y aprenden a contextualizar las obras en el marco histórico, social y estilístico; y a relacionarlas con otras manifestaciones culturales como la literatura y la música. El curso pretende enseñar las nociones básicas de la historia del arte, desarrollar la sensibilidad artística y profundizar en la capacidad analítica, oral y escrita, en español.

    Art History. Taking advantage of the numeros and varied works of art in the city of Salamanca, from painting to architecture, students learn to examine and describe masterpieces in their historical, social, and stylistic context, and to relate them to other culturally significant works in literature and music. This course aims to teach the basics of art history, develop artistic sensibility and deepen the analytical and descriptive – both written and oral – abilities of students in Spanish. Students use the city as their classroom, visiting sites of Roman engineering, via the Romanesque, Gothic and Baroque ruins that are found in Salamanca. In addition, students visit the museum of modern and contemporary art in the city.  The course culminates with a tour of Spanish art in the Prado Museum in Madrid.

  • En este curso los estudiantes aprenden a reunir la historia clínica del paciente; prueban algunas prácticas médicas como la disección y la extracción de ADN; y estudian la complejidad de la organización de sistemas como el digestivo o el cardiovascular, valorando la función individual y las relaciones entre ellos para comprender la estrecha relación que tienen las patologías. Al mismo tiempo debaten y toman perspectiva de cómo la ciencia se relaciona con temas éticos, morales, religiosos, económicos y legales, como pueden ser el aborto, la eutanasia o el negocio de las industrias farmacéuticas.

    Medicine. In this course, students learn to take a patient history and carry out a clinical exam; they debate ethical questions such as euthanasia and cloning; and they try out medical practices like dissection and the extraction of DNA. Through discussions and experiments, they are introduced to both research and practice in the field of medicine, and they explore the pathologies of certain diseases.

  • Este curso de expresión oral y escrita se dirige a los estudiantes que quieren enriquecer su vocabulario y afianzar el conocimiento de la gramática española, como el empleo del condicional y del subjuntivo, la conjugación de los tiempos verbales, o la elección de los pronombres personales y relativos. Los estudiantes leen la prensa regional y nacional, visionan extractos de películas contemporáneas, discuten sobre temas de actualidad y se inician en el arte del debate.

     

    This advanced course focusing on oral and written expression is designed for students who wish to enrich their vocabulary and improve their understanding of Spanish grammar and its complexities, such as the use of the subjunctive and the conditional tenses, verb tense agreement and the choice of personal and relative pronouns. Students read the national press and examine excerpts from contemporary films, they discuss current events and social issues and are introduced to the art of debate. They work on different types of writing and create a portfolio that they present at the end of the program.

    Perfecting the Language. This advanced course focusing on oral and written expression is designed for students who wish to enrich their vocabulary and improve their understanding of Spanish grammar and its complexities, such as the use of the subjunctive and the conditional tenses, verb tense agreement and the choice of personal and relative pronouns. Students read the national press and examine excerpts from contemporary films, they discuss current events and social issues and are introduced to the art of debate. They work on different types of writing and create a portfolio that they present at the end of the program.

    Este curso de expresión oral y escrita se dirige a los estudiantes que quieren enriquecer su vocabulario y afianzar el conocimiento de la gramática española, como el empleo del condicional y del subjuntivo, la conjugación de los tiempos verbales, o la elección de los pronombres personales y relativos. Los estudiantes leen la prensa regional y nacional, visionan extractos de películas contemporáneas, discuten sobre temas de actualidad y se inician en el arte del debate.

    Perfecting the Language. This advanced course focusing on oral and written expression is designed for students who wish to enrich their vocabulary and improve their understanding of Spanish grammar and its complexities, such as the use of the subjunctive and the conditional tenses, verb tense agreement and the choice of personal and relative pronouns. Students read the national press and examine excerpts from contemporary films, they discuss current events and social issues and are introduced to the art of debate. They work on different types of writing and create a portfolio that they present at the end of the program.

  • Dentro de la óptica de delimitar la complejidad de las relaciones que existen en regiones como el Oriente Medio, África y Sudamérica, los estudiantes se familiarizan con los principales modelos teóricos que influyen en las relaciones internacionales y examinan una serie de estudios de casos, guiados por expertos en la materia. Al final del curso los estudiantes organizan su propia cumbre acerca de un problema importante de actualidad.

    International Relations. With a goal toward grasping the complexity of the relationships at play in regions as disparate as the Middle East, Africa, and South America, students become familiar with the principal theoretical models that govern international relations, and examine a series of case studies, led by experts in the field. At the end of the course, students organize a mock summit focusing on a critical current issue.

  • Using innovative and interactive teaching methods, this course offers a review of tenses and structures, as well as vocabulary-building exercises with a strong focus on conversational proficiency. Language learning is approached through a variety of activities, such as storytelling and role playing, and short thematic units that take advantage of the city and bring students into contact with local native speakers.Students are evaluated on the first day and placed in a group with others of a similar level.

  • Taking full advantage of Barcelona, and using innovative and interactive teaching methods, this course offers a review of tenses and structures, as well as vocabulary-building exercises with a strong focus on conversational proficiency. Language learning is approached through a variety of activities, such as storytelling and role playing, and short thematic units that integrate museums and cultural sites, and bring students into contact with local native speakers. Students work on pronunciation, intonation, and public speaking. They are evaluated on the first day and placed in a group with others of a similar level.